Tree question - have fungus/hole in Maple tree

James Bomford jbomford at jbomford.demon.co.uk
Fri Sep 13 05:42:15 EST 1996


In article <3235BAC4.1B48 at worldnet.att.net>, Frank Abbott
<cnfm3 at worldnet.att.net> writes
>To whom it may concern,
>
>    I need help concerning a tree in my yard. Its a very tall Maple
>divided into two main branches. Its a fairly old tree and fungus and
>flying ants have really worked on it for awhile. Now squirls and other
>small animals go into the 4 - 5 inch at the base. I'd like to save the
>tree. I really can't top the tree and their is blacktop around it so it
>would be very hard to feed it. I have heard that one could put a
>fungicide in the cavity and then fill with cement
>Any help would be greatly appreciated - I want to save that beautiful
>tree.
>
>Thanks,
>Frank 
>cnfm3 at worldnet.att.net

I dont think its a good idea to try chemical type fungicides because your tree
is already quite weak and chemicals wont help that. Get some tea tree essential
oil from an essential oil supplier ( herbalist, pharmacist or new-age type
shop), dilute it (1 drop to a bucket of water) and water or paint the affected
area with it. 
Tea tree oil, by the way, works for any fungal problems and septic infections,
though for septic wounds I'd use it undiluted and on the infected area and allow
air to freshen and dry the wound. (do not use undiluted tea tree oil on
childrens or young animals skin as it is too strong, but dilute it somewhat).
I dont think cement is a good idea but you could block the hole/s with a wooden
plug/s to stop animals entering (make sure that there are none inside if you do
this).
Also you might need to look at what is around the maples' environment. Black
top/ Tarmac around the base of a tree will stop water and nutrients flowing
through the soil and furthermore toxic chemicals from the black top leaching
into the soil will harm the tree. If possible remove the black top (gently) from
around the tree and plant up with some species that would co-exist helpfully
with the maple tree. For info on this try looking at the forest gardening and
permaculture literature (Bill Mollison, Permaculture a designers manual, is
excellent)  
However gradual decay and recycling is what happens to trees as they get older.
Plant another tree or two.
Best wishes jim at jbomford.demon.co.uk


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