Forest Management for Recreation

James & Patti Woods woods at mail.telis.org
Thu Apr 16 23:55:53 EST 1998


I believe logging is the problem, not the solution.

On the Tahoe National Forest near my home several species such as the
Northern goshawk, Sierra Nevada red fox, pine marten, Pacific fisher,
wolverine, peregrine falcon and great grey owl are essentially extinct.
These species evolved within mature forest habitats and do not or cannot
adapt to the disturbance associated with extractive uses of our forests. I
feel we should not be driving wildlife into extinction no matter the
reason.

I further believe that two loggers with chainsaws can inflict more lasting
damage on a forest ecosystem in one day  than virtually any other
legitimate use of our forests over many years. That is not to say
recreational uses of the forest is completly benign. 

The American people will not long accept public land management practices
that do irreversible harm to wildlife, destroy fisheries, pollutes our
drinking water and contributes to huge stand replacing wildfires and
flooding. Dealing with all of that is bad enough. Let's not support any
more timber sales on our national forests whether they make money or not.

James Woods



mcready at northernnet.com wrote in article
<6h5kl9$g9$1 at nnrp1.dejanews.com>...
> All the hype about forest management being only for the benefit of the
timeber
> industry is hogwash!  Enviro groups love to stress the below cost timber
sale
> of the U.S. Forest Service.  They say more money can be made by managing
our
> forests for recreation.  What is the purpose of the U.S. Forest Service? 
To
> make money, or to manage our forests?
> 
> Just think of the economic impact on areas if you stop logging in our
> National Forests!!!  Along with the obvious loss of jobs, the loss of tax
> revenues from licenses and fees for hunting, ATVs, snowmobiles, etc.
> 
> The 'Zero Cut' agenda being pushed by once-respected environmental groups
is
> the worst thing for our National Forests.  It encourages a "NO
MANAGEMENT'
> plan for our forests, letting nature do it's thing.  This is not
responsible,
> or the most beneficial, forest management plan.  It is a waste of our
> renewable, nature resources.  These enviro groups equate forest
management
> with development, which is not true.
> 




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