landowner question re:post logging cleanup

BOBNDWOODS bobndwoods at aol.com
Thu Aug 6 22:50:50 EST 1998


In article <1998080617323400.NAA29408 at ladder01.news.aol.com>, wudman69 at aol.com
(Wudman69) writes:

>Some thoughts from South of the Mason-Dixon.....Generally speaking,
performance
>bonds are not used in the South.  I have been involved in the business as both
>a procurement forester and as a consultant.  Never in my career have I posted
>or required a performance bond.  The folks that I have dealt with have been
>pretty good over the years.  Only on one occasion have I encountered
>significant problems, and that logger went out of business shortly thereafter.

>Whenever you make a sale, be sure of the background of the buyer.  Look at
some
>of the jobs they have done in the past.  Ask around about his reputation. 
>These guys (loggers) work on reputation.  A good job will net them more
>business.  A poor one will put them out of business.

Here in Alabama the performance bond is used about half of the time on bid
sales.  Usually depending on the type of cut and how much damage can be done by
a poor quality logger.  A poor job may put a logger out of business, but then I
know of some who have been out of business 4 or 5 times.

My suggestion, for future reference, is to not require the logger to clean up
your site (except for reasonable requirements to remove trash and other refuse)
following logging.  A buyer who really intends to do the work will factor the
cost into his bid.  A buyer who has no intention to do the work will bid
higher, win the tract, and disappear.  It is usually better to maximize the
return on your sale and contract clean up work after the job is done.  Loggers
generally aren't equipped to do this kind of work.


Bob Miller
Alabama Registered Forester

~~~> The forest may be quiet, but that doesn't mean all the snakes have left.



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