trees for fencposts - and a lot more!

JimiFromMI jimifrommi at aol.com
Tue Aug 18 20:53:58 EST 1998


In article <1998081221495200.RAA06573 at ladder03.news.aol.com>, susan112 at aol.com
(Susan112) writes:

>Subject:	Re: trees for fencposts - and a lot more!
>From:	susan112 at aol.com (Susan112)
>Date:	12 Aug 1998 21:49:51 GMT
>
>I forget the original posters name, but...
>
>By lime he means elm..I don't know which would be the small leaved variety.

Perhaps Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia) or Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila) both of
which are resistant to Dutch Elm disease and suitable for zones 4-9 according
to The National Arbor Day Foundation.


>If you go this route, try Lacebark elm, it's resistant to Dutch elm disease.
>And
>(obviously to this group) don't use American chestnut due to chestnut blight.
>
>Susan
>
>

LES's description of the Chestnut / Hazlenut habitat sounds exactly like what
I'll be trying on a portion of my land.  I'll be using an American/Manchurian
cross that is blight resistant and also throwing in some Fiazels and possibly
other filberts.  Incidentally LES, from what I understand, the wild turkeys
will come in flocks to eat the hazel nuts <g>.

As the the majority of my hardwood stands are Sugar Maple with lesser amounts
of American Beech and Hemlock, I'll be making a concerted effort to increase
the mast species for wildlife benefits (oaks are personal favorites).

Stay tuned.  In early September my county forester will be visiting, hopefully
with recommendations of suitable methods for achieving my goals (regeneration
or planting -- I plan to reforest some of my farm fields).  Apparently he will
come with soil sample information in hand as well as airial photographs.

Incidentally, JOE, he already has indicated that he will not cross into the
realm of what local consulting foresters are selling.  I can't wait to see
where the line is drawn and just what services I'll be receiving from our tax
dollars.

Regards.




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