The Truth ISN'T Out There

dwheeler at teleport.com dwheeler at teleport.com
Tue Aug 25 11:49:26 EST 1998


In article <35E276B5.4EC1D72 at forestmeister.com>,
  Joseph Zorzin <redoak at forestmeister.com> wrote:
> BOBNDWOODS wrote:
>
> > The only problem is that I can't offer as much money lump sum as my competitor
> > who will do exactly what the landowner wants in the first place.  Money talks.
> >
> > Some folks won't see the truth even if you hit them over the head with it.
>
> This is the kind of thing that drives us all wild. A desire to do good
> for the forest, and you can lose the job to some land rapist.
>
> Perhaps it's time for the public to insist on silviculture. But I don't
> know how to do this without major political problems from all sides.
>
> Conservatives will say that the landowners has a right to WHATEVER he
> decides. And most conservatives ALSO don't like bureaucracies who'd have
> to enforce it- and who's to say the burros would be competent? There's
> no reason that putting a burro label on anyone makes them a better
> forester (for sure).
>
> Liberals/environmentalists might like the idea of good silviculture but
> might not like or trust the bureaucracy either. And they'll insist on
> bad ideas like "keep all the big trees" instead of good silviculture-
> which might even call for clearcuts.
>
> I'm not sure what the solution is. It's got to be low cost but high
> effectiveness.
>
> But we must have good silvicutlture for the health of the forest and for
> the good of the forest economy long term.
>
[snip]

You have just expressed the precise reason I got into mushrooms. When I
harvest a crop from a timbered stand, the trees still remain. And because I
harvest several species, I actually get several crops from the same stand at
different times of the year. The resulting $10-20 per pound paid to the
landowner allows him to improve the stand as he likes: provided that enough
trees to form full- canopy remain. At that point, selective harvest is not
only desireable, it is necessary for stand health.

Additionally, the landowner suddenly learns that the trees are the least
important economic commodity of his land, something many landowners are happy
to learn.

Daniel B. Wheeler
http://www.oregonwhitetruffles.com

-----== Posted via Deja News, The Leader in Internet Discussion ==-----
http://www.dejanews.com/rg_mkgrp.xp   Create Your Own Free Member Forum



More information about the Ag-forst mailing list