mushrooms on spruce logs?

dwheeler at dwheeler at
Sat Aug 29 11:12:36 EST 1998

In article <6s8oaq$pn5 at>,
  Alcuin Arkotxa-Mackenzie <Alcuin.Arkotxa-Mackenzie at>
> >Date: Fri, 28 Aug 1998 21:57:17 +0100
> >To: "bionet.agroforestry mail newsgroup" <server-daemon at>
> >From: Alcuin Arkotxa-Mackenzie <Alcuin.Arkotxa-Mackenzie at>
> >Subject: mushrooms on spruce logs?
> >
> >Dear All,
> >
> >Here is a great question for you : does anybody know if you can grow
> mushrooms on Sitka spruce logs?
> >
> >Thank you all,
> >
> >Alcuin
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
> ------------------------------------------
> Alcuin Arkotxa-MacKenzie,
> Oxford Forestry Institute,
> University of Oxford,South Parks Road,
> Oxford. OX1 3RB
> telephone: 00 44 1865 771005
> fax: 00 44 1865 275074

Since Sitka spruce produces masses of mushrooms, it is probable they could
also be cultivated. The most abundant fruiting I've seen is of Laetiporus
sulphureus near Cape Lookout State Park, about 12 miles SW of Tillamook,
Tillamook County, Oregon, USA. An old spruce tree had blown down in a
windstorm adjacent to a nature trail. The first year afterwards, there were
several clusters, each weighing about 50 pounds each. In England, I'd check
native fruitings of Laetiporus on old beech trees, much like the one shown in
the Kevin Costner film Robin Hood. The mycelium does not grow rapidly, and
appears to be a heartwood degrader. Here in the Pacific Northwest L. s. also
grows on Western hemlock, an ornamental flowering plum, and old-growth
Douglas fir. I have yet to see it fruiting on anything less than 8" diameter
(for the plum) or 3' diameter for the conifers. And locally, I nearly never
see it growing on hardwoods.

Daniel B. Wheeler

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