Assorted forestry news items (mostly eastern US)

ForestFair forestfair at aol.com
Fri Jan 16 16:05:27 EST 1998


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From: (Cornell University Forestry Listserv)
Subject: assorted forestry news items
Date: Fri, 16 Jan 1998 07:07:13 -0400

***************************
From: Charles Barden <cbarden at hp1.nena.org>
Subject: Forestry News
EASTERN FOREST HEALTH CONSORTIUM
Information Memo
December 1997

TOPICS.  Conference on riparian management. // Rust in southern pines. //
National Research Council releases report on non-federal forests. //
Urban
forest health gets boost in Minnesota. // Mealybug threatens Puerto Rico.
// Weed strategy available on web. // Three countries to regulate
dunnage.
// Information exchange encouraged.

CONFERENCE ON RIPARIAN MANAGEMENT.  Protecting and enhancing riparian
ecosystem functions and values challenge resource managers and
landowners.
"Riparian Management in Forests of the Continental Eastern U.S." is a
conference that will offer state-of-the-art information on managing
forested riparian systems.  Eighteen invited experts will make
presentations on riparian ecosystem management and research.  Information
from the presentations will be bound in a desk reference for participants
following the conference.  The conference is March 23-25 in Columbus,
Ohio.
To receive registration materials, check the Conference website at
http://www.ncfes.umn.edu/riparian/  .

RUST IN SOUTHERN PINES.  Fusiform rust has a significant impact in pine
plantations, especially plantations that are intensively managed.  It is
the most important disease in young pine plantations and causes
significant
losses, greatly decreasing productivity.  Advances in fighting rust have
come about through rust screening programs and rust research programs.
These programs feature inter-agency cooperation and cooperation among
scientific disciplines.  Nevertheless, rust continues to increase in some
ownerships, like on non-industrial private lands.  Nearly 7 million acres
of non-industrial private forest land (slash and loblolly) have at least
10% incidence of rust.  For more information on rust impact and the rust
screening program, call Robert Schmidt at (352) 846-0868.

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL RELEASES REPORT ON NON-FEDERAL FORESTS.  This
comprehensive report by the National Research Council addresses the
health
of the nearly 490 million acres of non-federal forests in the nation. 
The
report offers seven major recommendations.  The recommendations are (1)
to
ensure long-term integrity of forest ecosystems, (2) to offer programs
and
support to landowners, (3) to strengthen programs for sustainable
forests,
(4) to foster innovative investment policies, (5) to improve the quality
and availability of information, (6) to acknowledge the rights and
responsibilities of landowners, and (7) to contribute to global economies
and environments.  For more information, call Jerilyn Levi at (202)
205-1041.

URBAN FOREST HEALTH GETS BOOST IN MINNESOTA.  The Minnesota State
Legislature passed a spending bill aimed at helping communities with
their
forest health problems.  S80,000 is designated for oak wilt control, and
another S250,000 is available to maintain and improve the forest health
of
communities.  The funds are matched at least 1:1 with community dollars,
up
to S10,000 per grant.  For more information, call Peggy Sand at (612)
772-7925.


MEALYBUG THREATENS PUERTO RICO.  The pink mealybug, Maconellicoccus
hirsutus first appeared on three Caribbean islands in 1996.  By August of
1997 this exotic pest was detected on 16 islands plus the tiny island of
Vieques, only 8 miles from Puerto Rico.  The mealybug attacks
ornamentals,
but it also attacks trees that are an important part of the forest
component in Puerto Rico.  The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
(APHIS) began a biological control program against the pest by
collecting,
rearing, and releasing parasites and predators of the mealybug.  APHIS
reports decreased pest populations following the release.  For more
information, call Dale Meyerdirk at (301) 734-5667.

WEED STRATEGY AVAILABLE ON WEB.  "Pulling Together: National Strategy for
Invasive Plant Management" can be found on the Internet at
http://bluegoose
..arw.r9.fws.gov/ficmnewfiles/NatlweedStrategytoc.html  .  The Strategy
outlines a nationwide effort to stem the tide of potentially invasive
plants arriving in the United States; to control or eradicate those that
are already a problem; and to restore full function to degraded lands of
all types.  Three approaches are emphasized:  partnerships, education,
and
research.  The plan recognizes that a high level of cooperation will be
required among State and Federal agencies, private organizations,
interest
groups, corporations, farmers, ranchers, foresters, recreationists,
horticulturalists, educators, scientists, and individual citizens in
order
to deal with invasive weed problems.  Noxious weeds cause billions of
dollars of damage annually to various industries, and they threaten
biodiversity, habitat quality, and ecosystem functions.

THREE COUNTRIES TO REGULATE DUNNAGE.  Dunnage, the scrap lumber used to
stabilize goods in shipment, is a potential pathway for exotic pests
arriving in North America.  The pine shoot beetle, Tomicus piniperda, and
the Asian long-horned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, are recent
introductions of exotic pests with potential to damage eastern forests.
Pest experts hypothesize that both of these non-native species arrived in
dunnage.  The plant protection agencies of Canada, Mexico, and the United
States are working on joint regulations to reduce the exotic pest risk
from
dunnage.  The regulations would require documentation that dunnage be
free
of bark and all pests, or heat-treated, or fumigated prior to entry.  The
North American Plant Protection Organization, an affiliate of the Food
and
Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, is coordinating this
effort.  For more information on dunnage, call Ed Imai at (301) 734-7853.

INFORMATION EXCHANGE ENCOURAGED.  Pass this Info Memo along.  Share your
stories on forest health in the east.  Call Nancy Lorimer at (612)
649-5293.
DG N.Lorimer:S23A.  E-mail  /s=n.lorimer/ou1=s23a at mhs-fswa.attmail.com

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