Windthrow and Synoptic Climatology

gates gates at gates.demon.co.uk
Fri Jun 5 11:12:48 EST 1998


In article <Pine.SGI.3.96.980605045210.10307B-100000 at gpu>, Brendan
Murphy <murphyb at unbc.ca> writes
>Hi,
>
>I am interested in learning of any windthrow studies which have examined
>the synoptic climatology of severe winds.
>
>Thanks in advance,
>
>- Brendan Murphy
>  University of Northern British Columbia
>  Prince George, B.C.  CANADA
>
>email: murphyb at unbc.ca
>
>
Apart from the forest hot air on here winds don't usually last long.
However, in the great storm of 87 in S. UK we had a lot of effects.
Also last winter E. US had nasty ice storms that proved that while a
sapling may bend with the wind it may still break or at least not bend
back again.  I recommended a birch plantation was splinted in the hope
the grown over breaks wouldn't show at sale time.  Naughty but easier on
the pocket than starting again if you've the twine & labour free!

Generally the 87 experience, repeated in 90, was that standard planting
and logging left gaps wind could enter.  These winds became whirlwinds
and layed even mature trees over in corn circle style patterns.  The UK
Forest Authority, as the Forestry Commission is now & who I advise,
accepts the right way to deal with this as I recommend but as usual
forest types take years to adopt new techniques.  Nevertheless, the
answer is to underplant to form a secondary canopy before selctive
logging/felling and to feather edges of stands with smaller trees and
shrubs.  This is especially valuable when the wind profile of the stand
of timber is exposed due to it being on a hill.  It is also a good idea
to plant around contours, not in straight rows the wind can whistle
through.  Spacing and apparent lines can still be weeded by machine if
wished as planting is not as haphazard as first appears.  Fire breaks
should also be feathered and not straight for too long.    

The small trees can be fruit/nut oriented for wildlife or human.  In a
new park here I am having crops the people can take free to supplement
diet in a poorish area.  This includes rowan and crab apple for jelly as
well as things like hazel which can be coppiced as well as provide nuts.
Same with shrubs to include medlar, bullace, currants and so on.  This
microenvironment can also be used to support different fungi crops from
main stands.  A stone wall area on the hills is being used with doubled
walls.  Moving the non important midfield walls to main walls often
centuries old gives a sheep free area for planting trees which will grow
protected for first few years.  Inside walls can be sown with restaurant
friendly herbs and floor can be spoored with fungi again for restaurant
trade.  As trees grow and cover area they can be coppiced.  This
includes being used to teach bodging, coppicing, hedging, pole lathe
turning, etc. to townies on courses.  Minimal camping facilities are
needed for accommodation but a container or two, for storage and
shelter, are handy.  They also provide shelter for more trees.  Once
established the container can be moved and more trees planted.  In this
way a three phase copse is possible on hills which were forested but
where now no tree will normally grow OK.  ie outer scrubby defence, mid
quick growing stuff for coppice / forest/farm use and some inner timber
trees.  Extrapolate as desired including making hurdles or dead hedges
instead of walls.  These won't suppot herbs but you can hang rough boxes
on the inside to some extent.  Hope this assists.   Regards,   Les

PS Any large sums of dosh you think this info. deserves will be
gratefully received.
KIND REGARDS FROM:

L             E E E E E E       S S S S S 
L             E                S         S
L             E                S S
L             E E E                S S
L             E                        S S
L             E                S         S                       
L L L L L     E E E E E E       S S S S S

THE AUTHOR OF THE MESSAGE ABOVE IS TERRIBLY CLEVER AND PERFECTLY QUALIFIED
TO GIVE ANY OPINION THAT HE HAS.  NO COPYRIGHT NOTICE IS ATTACHED AS TERRIBLY
CLEVER PEOPLE KNOW HOW TO ISSUE WRITS.  WORDS OF GREAT WISDOM COULD BE
APPENDED TO THIS SIG. BUT THE AUTHOR IS SO VERY CLEVER THAT HE NOW CHARGES
TO PROVIDE THEM AND ONLY REPLIES TO NEWSGROUP POSTINGS FOR HIS OWN AMUSEMENT.

  LES BALLARD, TREE WIZARD, C/O BM: GATES OF ANNWN, LONDON WC1N 3XX, U.K.
                            44+(0)1708 863080

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