Sam, (3yrs 11mo) wants to know: What happens to trees when they die?

gates gates at gates.demon.co.uk
Fri May 29 12:51:20 EST 1998


Trees are here to help man (and woman) and for man (and of course woman)
to help trees.  They compliment one another very well but trees have to
be properly managed.  (So do people but this is harder.)  Anyway, this
managment of trees includes making sure you plant more trees before you
chop the old ones down to use them.  Further, trees are best for timber
a long time before they would die naturally.  This means we can plan
when trees planted in the past, now or in the future will be ready to
cut.  A few trees should always be left to get really old, for wildlife
and eating picnics under, but have to be cut before they get dangerous.
Otherwise they can fall and hurt people.

Trees that are cut for timber have not died and are not dead.  It is
merely like cutting your legs off!  You don't die as a result,
necessarily.  In our houses, ships and anything else we make with lots
of wood we hope for the strength and joy of the timber - it's soul if
you like - to add something to our lives.  Certainly there is the beauty
of the wood to admire.  Of course the plant that remains after the log
is cut away may die but it can carry on and send up new shoots.  This is
called coppicing and lets some trees live 2000 years instead of 200.
Even if the stump and roots do die there are thousands of responsible
people trying to ensure that the species, even the local strain of tree
specie, does not die:  That there will be new trees of the same sort to
grow and be strong for a new generation of people.  The sort of forestry
we should all hate is just cutting down trees with no thought of
tomorrow.  We know that of all the trees there are, most are too old to
give us much oxygen, or eat the gas we breathe out and we need to
replace these.  At the same time some people, for example on the edge of
the sahara desert, cut trees before they are even half grown.  They have
to burn wood to cook and keep warm, they say.  Well, the trees were
planted to help keep back the marching sands of the desert so that the
people can keep their homes and their farms.  But the people do not
listen and cut the trees, have too many children and then have to move
to the town what with having no land any more.  Perhaps, Sam, your
parents are as thoughtless and stupid as the ones I have written of.
You see the baby problem is a big part of the people management I
mentioned earlier.  We need far fewer babies in some areas - most in
fact - but parents are thoughtless for anything and any one but
themselves and go around having far too many babies.  They grow up and
want to cut wood themselves and you can't be around all the time,
protecting the trees, so it is all a big problem.  However, cheer up and
smile Sam!  You are guaranteed not to live long enough to die of old age
- oxygen will run out first - but you will get to 60 or so and, where
you live, have as good a life as people can expect anywhere in the
world.  What money you make you can enjoy without worrying about
pensions or anything.  Alternatively, of course, you could be the very
person to solve all these problems.  I certainly hope so.  Meanwhile,
plant a tree!     
KIND REGARDS FROM:

L             E E E E E E       S S S S S 
L             E                S         S
L             E                S S
L             E E E                S S
L             E                        S S
L             E                S         S                       
L L L L L     E E E E E E       S S S S S

THE AUTHOR OF THE MESSAGE ABOVE IS TERRIBLY CLEVER AND PERFECTLY QUALIFIED
TO GIVE ANY OPINION THAT HE HAS.  NO COPYRIGHT NOTICE IS ATTACHED AS TERRIBLY
CLEVER PEOPLE KNOW HOW TO ISSUE WRITS.  WORDS OF GREAT WISDOM COULD BE
APPENDED TO THIS SIG. BUT THE AUTHOR IS SO VERY CLEVER THAT HE NOW CHARGES
TO PROVIDE THEM AND ONLY REPLIES TO NEWSGROUP POSTINGS FOR HIS OWN AMUSEMENT.

  LES BALLARD, TREE WIZARD, C/O BM: GATES OF ANNWN, LONDON WC1N 3XX, U.K.
                            44+(0)1708 863080



 



More information about the Ag-forst mailing list