REPORTS AND RESOURCES - Nov. 12, 1998

wafcdc at americanlands.org wafcdc at americanlands.org
Thu Nov 12 14:35:02 EST 1998


From: American Lands <wafcdc at americanlands.org>
Subject: REPORTS AND RESOURCES - Nov. 12, 1998

TO:          All Activists
FROM:     Steve Holmer
DATE:     November 12, 1998

SUBJECT:  REPORTS AND RESOURCES


LCV SCORECARDS RELEASED  

     The League of Conservation Voters has released its 1998
National Environmental Scorecard.  The scorecard is based on eight
votes in the Senate and 13 votes in the House, selected by a panel of
environmental group advisers.  The votes involved issues such as
property rights, funding priorities, international family planning,
logging in national forests, and global warming.  According to the
report House Democrats averaged 72%, House Republicans averaged
24%, Senate Democrats averaged 84% and Senate Republicans
averaged 12%.  The full report is available on the Internet at
http://www.lcv.org or by calling 202/785-8683   


ANCIENT TREES AND THE BOTTOM LINE: A
HEADWATERS JOURNEY

     This book by Joan Dunning, photographs by Doug Thron is a
highly informed, comprehensive and, at the same time, very personal
journey. It is beautifully written and the photographs are powerful, the
cover photo alone is worth the price of the book. Doug Thron has
chronicled on film the life and death of the Headwaters for years. "The
destruction of Headwaters is a personal issue.  It is about the children
who sleep in the bedrooms of our own houses.  It is about the children
we hold to our hearts and nurture to reach adulthood on a dying planet. 
It is about finally saying, 'Enough!' to people who accumulate more
wealth than they can possibly count or comprehend in a sick corporate
game of 'bottom line.'  This is the story of one person's journey behind
the scenes of the destruction of one of the most magnificent ecosystems
on Earth."  Chelsea Green Publishing Company, PO Box 428, White
River Junction, Vermont 05001, 800-639-4099,
www.chelseagreen.com, $24.95. ISBN 1-890132-11-X


TRASHING OUR FORESTS

     With the message, "Save Our Forests, Stop Junk Mail," activists
dumped loads of catalogs at the world's largest direct mail convention
held annually by the Direct Marketing Association in San Francisco. 
"100 million trees are cut each year to make junk mail and half of it no
one will ever read," says EarthCulture's Rick Spencer.  "Over 100
forest-dwelling species become extinct every single day.  How many of
them were driven off the face of the earth for the latest Victoria's
Secret catalog?"  The average American receives around 600
unrequested catalogs, credit card applications, sweepstakes entry
forms, and other direct mail, adding up to a total of over 4.5 million
tons each year. Nearly 50% of this mail is never read and very little is
recycled.  To get your name removed from mail marketing lists, write
to: Mail Preference Service, Direct Market Association, PO Box 9008,
Farmingdale, NY 11735-9008


WORLD FORESTS IMPERILED

     A new study from the Worldwatch Institute reports that
increased demand for paper and wood products, illegal logging and
industrial burning has turned local forest destruction into a global
catastrophe, reports The Middle East Observer.  As forests have been
shrinking, wood consumption has doubled and paper use has tripled in
the last 35 years.  Due to the cutting and burning of forests the world s
forests now lose more carbon to the atmosphere than they produce.  As
countries, such as Japan, deplete their domestic forests they turn to
poor countries where they can buy hectares for pennies.  Consumers,
governments and businesses have begun to find ways to meet the
demand for forest products while still preserving the values of intact
forests.   By scaling up the efforts already underway, we can begin to
turn away from today s destructive relationship and move towards
managing our forests so that all of their benefits and services, from
timber and jobs to flood control and climate regulation, are available
for generations to come,  says Janet Ambramovitz, author of Taking a
Stand: Cultivating a New Relationship With the World s Forests.


WOODWISE CONSUMER  

     Co-op America publishes Woodwise Consumer, a guide to
buying products and supporting practices that don t destroy forests. 
The publication includes questions and answers from readers, paper
saving strategies for the office, home and during the holidays, as well
as information about home improvement, wardrobe and books and
magazines.  The guide also includes a resource directory of companies
that sell  WoodWise  products.  If you would like more information or
a copy of the publication please contact WoodWise Consumer Initiative 
Co-op America, 1612 K Street NW, Washington, DC 20006.  Tel:
202/872-5307  Fax: 202/331-8166  Web: www.woodwise.org


A SENSE OF PLACE: AN ATLAS OF ISSUES, ATTITUDES AND
RESOURCES IN THE YELLOWSTONE TO YUKON
ECOREGION Edited by Louisa Willcox, Bart Robinson, and Ann
Harvey, April 1998.
     Y2Y:  The Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative is a
network of over 170 conservation organizations and individuals in the
United States and Canada that seek to conserve the beauty, health and
natural diversity of the Rocky Mountains from the Greater Yellowstone
Ecosystem in the south to the Yukon s Mackenzie Mountains in the
north.   As part of Y2Y's conservation work they have released A
Sense of Place: Issues, Attitudes and Resources in the Yellowstone to
Yukon Ecoregion.  A Sense of Place is a collection of papers written
and compiled by experts from the United States and Canada meant to
be a guidebook for those people exploring large-scale conservation.  

     A Sense of Place describes the Y2Y ecoregion and surveys its
natural resources; summarizes the region's human-caused threats and
habitat trends; describes the implications of these threats and trends for
the future; and fosters a common understanding about ecological,
economic, and First Nations/Native American issues that will provide a
foundation of future discussions on strategies to maintain the integrity
of the region in the long term.  A Sense of Place provides detailed
maps and tables of species distribution, economic trends, and other
related subjects.  For more information or a copy of A Sense of Place
please contact Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative  710 9th
Street, Studio B, Canmore, Alberta T1W 2V7 Tel: 403/609-2666  Fax:
403/609-2667  E-mail: Y2Y at banff.net  Price of the Atlas is $25 USD
and $35 Cdn (including postage). To order a copy, contact Kathleen
Wiebe at 1-800-966-7920, by phone at 403-609-2644, via fax at
403-609-2667, or by mail at 710 9th St., Studio B,  Canmore, AB.
Canada T1W 2V7.


WHY THE Y2Y: A TEACHERS' GUIDE TO THE
YELLOWSTONE TO YUKON CONSERVATION INITIATIVE

     In this program, students learn about the science and social
science of the Y2Y Conservation Initiative through a stepwise pedagogy
that leads the learner to a complete understanding of the Y2Y idea. 
Stories, activities, cartoon illustrations and maps present learning
opportunities for students, and background information provides
teachers with the necessary tools for teaching this concept. This
70-page activity guide is available for $10 plus handing and shipping
charges.  To order your copy, contact the Canadian Parks And
Wilderness Society - Calgary-Banff Chapter at 1-403-232-6686
(fax403-232-6988), or via email at cpawscal at cadvision.com.


American Lands, formerly Western Ancient Forest Campaign has moved. 
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Steve Holmer
Campaign Coordinator

American Lands 
726 7th Street, SE
Washington, D.C. 20003
202/547-9105
202/547-9213 fax
wafcdc at americanlands.org




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