@ Project Censored 1998 Top Stories @

James Graf jhgraf at email.msn.com
Fri Mar 19 18:46:27 EST 1999


Dan Clore:

This list should really be called The Most Ignored Stories. There's another
list, unknown to Project Censored, that consists of the stories so
thoroughly censored that they were never published. Two examples:

"Hard Realities" at http://www.angelfire.com/nj/jhgraf/hardreal.html
"A Nation In Denial" at http://www.angelfire.com/nj/jhgraf/anid.html

James Henry Graf

Dan Clore wrote in message <36E78801.1 at columbia-center.org>...
>A - I N F O S  N E W S  S E R V I C E
>            http://www.ainfos.ca/
> ________________________________________________
>
>Threats to U.S. sovereignty through secret 'Multinational Agreement on
>Investment' Top Project Censored's 1999 list of 10 most censored stories
>ROHNERT PARK, CALIF - Some developments in the course of history have
>such
>potential to impact nations and humans that it would be irresponsible to
>ignore them.
>
>Yet few mainstream news organizations have reported on the Multilateral
>Agreement on Investment (MAI), which would set in place a vast series of
>protections for foreign investment. According to reports in the
>alternative
>press, the MAI would threaten national sovereignty by giving
>corporations
>near equal rights to nations. This agreement has the potential to place
>profits ahead of human rights and social justice, and that is why our
>judges named this story the No.1 censored or under reported story of
>1998
>
>MAI, hatched in secret negotiations that began in 1995 among the U.S.
>and
>28 other nations, could thrust the world economy much closer to a system
>where international corporate capital would hold free reign over the
>democratic values and socioeconomic needs of people. The MAI will also
>have
>devastating effects on a nation's legal, environmental and cultural
>sovereignty. It will force countries to relax or nullify human,
>environmental and labor protection to attract investment and trade.
>Necessary measures such as food subsidies, control of land speculation,
>agrarian reform and health and environmental standards can be challenged
>as
>"illegal" under the MAI. This same illegality is extended to community
>control of forests, local bans on use of pesticides, clean air
>standards,
>limits on mineral, gas and oil extraction, and bans on toxic dumping.
>
>The stories, plus timely articles and reviews about the media and a
>resource guide are included in the new Project Censored Yearbook:
>Censored
>1999: The News That Didn't Make the News. [For review copies, contact
>Seven
>Stories Press, 212-995-0908]
>
>The apparent goal of the latest international trade negotiations is to
>safeguard multinational corporate investments by eliminating democratic
>regulatory control by nation states and local governments, the authors
>report.
>
>More radical than NAFTA or GATT, MAI would thrust the world much closer
>to
>a transnational laissez-faire system where international corporate
>capital
>would hold free reign over the democratic wishes and socioeconomic needs
>of
>people.
>
>Mostly ignored by mainstream press, in-depth coverage of this issue was
>offered in the following sources: IN THESE TIMES, "Building the Global
>Economy," Jan. 11, 1998, by Joel Bleifuss; DEMOCRATIC LEFT, "MAI Ties,"
>Spring 1998, by Bill Dixon; TRIBUNE DES DRIOTS HUMAINS, "Human Rights or
>Corporate Rights?" April 1998, Volume 5, No.s 1-2, by Miloon Kothari and
>Tara Krause.
>
>The winners of what are commonly referred to as the Pulitzer Prize of
>investigative reporting were announced today at a ceremony at Sonoma
>State
>University, where Project Censored is based.
>
>Prof. Peter Phillips, director of the program, said the annual project
>is
>conducted by more than 125 faculty, student researchers and interns, and
>community experts.  The final 25 censored stories are ranked in order of
>significance by a panel of national judges including members of the
>media,
>authors and educators.
>
>Phillips said he hopes to see a network of alternative press sharing
>significant stories the public needs to know as control of mainstream
>media, and therefore, what most people know, falls into the control of
>an
>increasingly reduced number of corporate board rooms.
>
>THE TOP 10 UNDER-REPORTED STORIES OF 1998 ARE:
>
>1. SECRET INTERNATIONAL TRADE AGREEMENT UNDERMINES THE SOVEREIGNTY OF
>NATIONS: The Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI) plans to set in
>place protections for foreign investment by giving corporations near
>equal
>rights to nations, pressuring nations to to relax or nullify human,
>environmental and labor protection in order to attract investment and
>trade.
>Sources: IN THESE TIMES, "Building the Global Economy," January 11,
>1998,
>by Joel Bleifuss; DEMOCRATIC LEFT, "MAI Ties," Spring 1998, by Bill
>Dixon;
>TRIBUNE DES DRIOTS HUMAINS, "Human Rights or Corporate Rights?" April
>1998,
>Volume 5, No.s 1-2.
>
>2. CHEMICAL CORPORATIONS PROFIT OFF BREAST CANCER: Leaders in cancer
>treatment and information are the same chemical companies that also
>produce
>carcinogenic products.
>Sources: RACHEL'S ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH WEEKLY, "The Truth About Breast
>Cancer," Dec. 4, 1997, by Peter Montague; THE GREEN GUIDE, "Profiting
>Off
>Breast Cancer” Oct. 1998, by Allison Sloan and Tracy Baxter.
>
>3. MONSANTO'S GENETICALLY MODIFIED SEEDS THREATEN WORLD PRODUCTION:
>Delta
>Land and Pine Company and the US Department of Agriculture have been
>awarded a patent on a technique that genetically disables seed, causing
>farmers to buy new seed each year instead of saving old ones.
>Sources: MOJO WIRE Title: "A Seedy Business"
>http://www.motherjones.com/news-Wire/broydo.html
>Date: April 7, 1998, by Leora Broydo; THIRD WORLD RESURGENCE #92, "New
>Patent Aims to Prevent Farmers From Saving Seed," by Chakravarthi
>Raghavan
>EARTH ISLAND JOURNAL Title: "Terminator Seeds Threaten an End to
>Farming,"
>Fall 1998, by Hope Shand and Pat Mooney; THE ECOLOGIST, "Monsanto: A
>Checkered History" and "Revolving Doors: Monsanto and the Regulators,"
>Sept./Oct. 1998, Vol. 28, No. 5, by Brian Tokar.
>
>4. RECYCLED RADIOACTIVE METALS MAY BE IN YOUR HOME:  Under special
>government permits, "decontaminated" radioactive metal is being sold to
>manufacture everything from knives and forks and belt buckles to
>zippers,
>eyeglasses, dental fillings and IUDs.
>Source: THE PROGRESSIVE, "Nuclear Spoons," October 1998, by Anne-Marie
>Cusac
>
>5. U. S. WEAPONS LINKED TO THE DEATHS OF A HALF A MILLION CHILDREN:
>Although the United States defames the Iraqi government for damaging the
>environment and ignoring U.N. Security Council resolutions, it has
>itself
>engaged in covert wars in defiance of the World Court, and left behind a
>swath of ecological disasters in its continuing geopolitical crusade.
>Since
>the end of the Gulf War, about 1.5 million Iraqis have died as a result
>of
>US/UN sanctions, about one-third of the children, says the Rev. Dr.
>Robert
>M. Bowman, an air force lieutenant colonel.
>Sources: SAN FRANCISCO BAY GUARDIAN, "Made in America,” Feb. 25, 1998,
>by
>Dennis Bernstein; I.F. MAGAZINE, "Punishing Saddam or the Iraqis,
>March/April 1998, by Bill Blum; SPACE AND SECURITY NEWS, "Our Continuing
>War Against Iraq," May 1998, by the Most Rev. Dr. Robert M. Bowman, Lt.
>Col., USAF (retired).
>
>6. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR PROGRAM SUBVERTS U.N.'S COMPREHENSIVE TEST BAN
>TREATY: When scientists in India conducted a deep underground test on
>May
>11, it was seen as a violation of the United Nation's Comprehensive Test
>Ban Treaty. However, two months before, the United States carried out a
>test that went largely unnoticed by the American media. Underground
>experiments aren't the U.S. Government's only method of subverting the
>Treaty, says The Nation. On the same day as the U.S. test, Russia
>conducted
>a subcritical test at its site at Novaya Zemlya. In defending the
>experiment to the press, Russian officials pointed to the U.S. test.
>Source: THE NATION, "Virtual Nukes-When is a Test Not a Test?" June
>15,1998, by Bill Mesler.
>
>7. GENE TRANSFERS LINKED TO DANGEROUS NEW DISEASES: The world is heading
>for a major crisis in public health as both emergent and recurring
>diseases
>reach new heights of antibiotic resistance. A major contributing factor
>to
>the emergence of at least 30 new diseases over the past 20 years, just
>might be the transfer of genes between unrelated species of animals and
>plants which takes place with genetic engineering, according to Third
>World
>Resurgence.
>Sources: THIRD WORLD RESURGENCE, #92, "Sowing Diseases, New and Old," by
>Mae-Wan Ho, and Terje Traavik; THE ECOLOGIST, "The Biotechnology
>Bubble,"
>May/June 1998, Vol. 28, No. 3, by Mae-Wan Ho, Hartmut Meyer and Joe
>Cummins.
>
>8. CATHOLIC HOSPITAL MERGERS THREATEN REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS FOR WOMEN:
>Nationwide hospital mergers with Roman Catholic church medical
>facilities
>are threatening women's access to abortions, sterilization, birth
>control,
>in vitro fertilization, fetal tissue experimentation, and assisted
>suicide.
>In 1996, over 600 hospitals merged with Catholic institutions in 19
>states.
>Source: Ms.,"Women's Health: A Casualty of Hospital Merger Mania?”
>July/August 1998, BY Christine Dinsmore
>
>9. U. S. TAX DOLLARS SUPPORT DEATH SQUADS IN CHIAPAS: In Jalisco,
>Mexico,
>more than a dozen young men were kidnaped and tortured. Salvador Jimenez
>Lopez, died, drowning in his own blood when his tongue was cut out. The
>group responsible for these and other atrocities are allegedly members
>of
>the Mexican Army Airborne Special Forces Groups (GAFE)-a paramilitary
>unit
>trained by U.S. Army Special Forces.
>Sources: SLINGSHOT, "Mexico's Military: Made in the USA," Summer 1998,
>by
>Slingshot collective; DARK NIGHT FIELD NOTES/ZAPATISMO, "Bury My Heart
>At
>Acteal," by Darrin Wood.
>
>1O. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDENT ACTIVISTS GUNNED DOWN ON CHEVRON OIL FACILITY
>IN
>NIGERIA: On May 28,1998, Nigerian National soldiers were helicoptered by
>Chevron employees to the Chevron owned oil facility off the coast of
>Nigeria in order to attack student demonstrators who had occupied a
>barge
>anchored to the facility. After an onslaught of attacks, two students
>lay
>dead, and several others were wounded.
>Sources: ERA ENVIRONMENTAL TESTIMONIES, "Chevron in Nigeria,” July 10,
>1998, by Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth Nigeria;
>PACIFICA
>RADIO, "Drilling and Killing: Chevron and Nigeria's Oil Dictatorship"
>Pacifica Radio/www.pacifica.org, September 1998, by Amy Goodman and
>Jeremy
>Scahill.
>
>CENSORED STORIES # 11-25 OF 1998
>
>#11.  PRIVATE PRISON EXPANSION BECOMES BIG BUSINESS
>Source: TURNING THE TIDE "The Prison Industry and The Global Complex"
>Summer 1998
>        Private prisons are one of the fastest growing sectors of the
>prison industrial complex. Under contract by the government to run jails
>and prisons, and paid a fixed sum per prisoner, corporate firms operate
>as
>cheaply and efficiently as possible to insure a profit. This means lower
>wages for staff, no unions, and fewer services for prisoners.
>Substandard
>diets, extreme overcrowding, and abuses by poorly trained personnel have
>all been documented as practices of this private business approach to
>incarceration.
>
># 12.  MILLIONS OF AMERICANS RECEIVED CONTAMINATED POLIO VACCINE BETWEEN
>1955 AND 1963
>Sources: CHICAGO LIFE, "Ticking Time Bomb", October 1997 by Vicky
>Angelos,
>and
>http://www.sightings.com/health/salk.htm, "The Forty Year Legacy of
>Tainted
>Polio Vaccine", May 14, 1998 by Harold Stearley
>        The once hailed 'miracle' vaccine was contaminated by a virus
>called Simian Virus 40 (SV40) between the years of 1955 and 1963. The
>virus
>hid in the renal cells of the monkeys which were used to make the
>vaccine.
>SV40 has been linked to rare, incurable cancers such as ependymomas
>(brain
>tumors), mesotheliomas (pleural tumors, usually of the lung), and
>osteosarcomas (bone malignancies).
>
># 13.  CHINA VIOLATES HUMAN RIGHTS IN TIBET
>Source: TOWARD FREEDOM, "China's War on Women", March/April 1998 by
>Natasha
>Ma
>        Throughout most of history, Tibetan women have enjoyed greater
>equality with men than have their Asian neighbors. Since China's
>invasion
>of Tibet in 1959, they have been at the forefront of the nonviolent
>struggle for independence-nearly half of the protests staged over the
>last
>decade have been led by nuns. During that time, however, thousands of
>Tibetan women have been arrested, incarcerated, sexually abused,
>tortured,
>and publicly executed.
>
># 14.  POLITICAL CONTRIBUTIONS COMPROMISE AMERICAN JUDICIAL SYSTEM
>Source: THE NATION, "The Buying of the Bench", January 26, 1998 by
>Sheila
>Kaplan
>        America's justice system is being compromised by campaign
>contributions to judges from special interest groups and Corporate
>Political Action Committees (PACS).
>
># 15.  SWAT TEAMS REPLACE CIVILIAN POLICE: TARGET MINORITY COMMUNITIES
>Source: COVERT ACTION QUARTERLY, "Operation Ghetto Storm: The Rise In
>Paramilitary Policing", Fall 1997 by Peter Cassidy
>        In the twenty-five years since the creation of the first Special
>Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams in Los Angeles, police forces across
>the
>United States have become increasingly militarized. Paramilitary police
>teams originally only operated in urban areas, but in recent years the
>number of special task forces throughout the country, including rural
>police departments, has dramatically increased.
>
># 16.  MERCENARY ARMIES IN SERVICE TO GLOBAL CORPORATIONS
>Sources: CAQ, "Mercenary Armies & Mineral Wealth, Fall 1997, No. 62 by
>Pratap Chatterjee, and MULTINATIONAL MONITOR, "Guarding the
>Multinationals", March 1998 by Pratap Chatterjee
>        In many countries, multinational corporations have paid directly
>for private policing services from the local army; or have hired outside
>security companies to harass nationals who protest against the
>environmental impact of their operations. The firms involved represent a
>growing number of new corporate security operations around the world,
>linking former intelligence officers, standing armies, and local death
>squads.
>
># 17.  U. S. MEDIA PROMOTES BIASED COVERAGE ON BOSNIA
>Sources: CAQ "Misinformation: TV Coverage of a Bosnian Camp", Fall 1998,
>No. 65 by Thomas Deichmann, and CAQ "Seeing Yugoslavia Through A Dark
>Glass", Fall 1998, No. 65 by Diana Johnstone
>        A visit to the camps of Omarska and Trnopolje by a British team
>from Independent Television (ITN) on August 5, 1992 gave rise to the
>image
>of the Serbs as the new Nazis of the Balkans. A widely published photo
>taken by ITN pictured an emaciated Muslin behind barbed wire with
>comrades
>imprisoned behind him. ITN's photo was not, however, as accurate as it
>seemed. The men in the photo were not standing behind barbed wire. In
>fact
>the Hague Tribunal confirmed that there was no barbed wire surrounding
>the
>Belesn 92 at Trnopolje. The emaciated Muslim shown with his shirt off
>was
>in fact a very ill man selected to be featured in the photo. Trnopolje
>was
>not a concentration camp, it was a refugee and transit center. Many
>Muslims
>traveled there for protection and could leave whenever they wished.
>
># 18. MANHATTAN PROJECT COVERED UP EFFECTS OF FLUORIDE TOXICITY
>Source: WASTE NOT, "Fluoride, Teeth and the Atomic Bomb", September 1997
>by
>Joel Griffiths and Chris Bryson
>        Recently declassified government documents have shed new light
>on
>the decades-old debate over the fluoridation of drinking water, and have
>added to a growing body of scientific evidence concerning the health
>effects of fluoride. Much of the original evidence about fluoride, which
>suggested it was safe for human consumption in low doses, was actually
>generated by "Manhattan Project" scientists in the 1940s. New evidence
>shows that researchers were ordered to cover-up evidence of the dangers
>of
>fluoride and it's levels of toxicity to avoid lawsuit by exposed
>civilians.
>
># 19.  CLINTON'S ADMINISTRATION LOBBIED FOR RETENTION OF TOXIC CHEMICALS
>IN
>CHILDREN'S TOYS
>Source: MULTINATIONAL MONITOR, "Out of the Mouths of Babes", June 1998
>by
>Charlie Gray
>        The Clinton Administration and the Commerce Department have
>lobbied
>on behalf of U.S. toy and chemical manufacturers against proposed new
>European Union (EU) restrictions which would prevent children's exposure
>to
>toxic chemicals released by polyvinyl chloride (PVC) toys such as
>teething
>rings.
>
># 20.  DEVELOPERS BUILD ON FLOOD PLAINS AT TAXPAYERS EXPENSE
>Source: MOTHER JONES, "Rain Check", March/April 1998, vol. 23 issue 2 by
>Marc Herman
>        According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA),
>some
>10 million people in the U.S. currently live on floodplains, and
>developers
>are rapidly building more homes in these areas. Of these households at
>risk
>of flooding, only one fourth actually carries insurance; the rest will
>rely
>on federal disaster relief funds if their homes are flooded. Many of
>these
>people face repeated flooding, and the American taxpayer is paying the
>tab.
>
># 21.  GLOBAL OIL RESERVES ALARMINGLY OVER ESTIMATED
>Source: SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, "The End of Cheap Oil", March 1998 by Colin
>J.
>Campbell and Jean H. Laherrere
>        Colin J. Campbell and Jean H. Laherrere, two independent
>oil-industry consultants, predict that global production of conventional
>oil will start to decline within the next ten years, and be unable to
>keep
>up with demand thereafter. Their analysis contradicts oil-industry
>reports
>which suggest we have another 50 years worth of cheap oil to sustain us.
>As
>the independent report points out, economic and political motives cause
>oil-producing companies and countries to publish the inflated figure,
>and
>this affects all of us.
>
># 22.   ACADEMIA AT RISK AS TENURED PROFESSORS VANISH
>Sources: ON CAMPUS, "The Vanishing Professor", September 1998 by Barbara
>McKenna
>        The bedrock of higher education, the tenured full-time faculty,
>have become an endangered species. According to the American Federation
>of
>Teachers (AFT), the number of tenured full-time faculty is rapidly
>decreasing on college campuses. Full-time faculty are being replaced by
>part-time faculty who are paid two-thirds what tenured professors earn,
>and
>receive substandard benefits. At least 43% of college instructors
>nationwide are now part-time faculty. The hiring of part-time lecturers
>increased by 266% between 1979 and 1995.
>
># 23.  BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CHARGED WITH HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS
>AGAINST THE SHOSHONE NATION
>Source: NEWS FROM INDIAN COUNTRY: THE NATION'S NATIVE JOURNAL, "BLM
>fines
>Western Shoshone $564,00 Despite OAS Request", May 1998, Vol. 12,
> No. 9 by Pat Calliotte
>        A decades-old dispute with the Bureau of Land Management has led
>the Western Shoshone tribe to take the conflict to an international
>level.
>The OAS' Inter-American Commission on Human Rights has asked the United
>States to "stay" all actions pending further investigations; but,
>according
>to News From Indian Country (NFIC), the BLM has "not responded" to
>documents supporting Western Shoshone land rights.
>
>#24.  COCA COLA FAILS TO MEET RECYCLING PLEDGE
>Source: EARTH ISLAND JOURNAL, "Coca Cola: Recycling Outlaw", Winter 1998
>by
>Marti Matsch
>        In 1990 Coca Cola made a promise to use its recycled plastic
>bottles in new production as it has successfully done in Europe and
>numerous other countries. Eight years later they have yet to follow
>through
>with that promise. This failure to act has kept the price of recycled
>PET
>bottles low in the market place and discouraged expanded PET recycling
>programs nationwide.
>
>#25.  ABC BROADCASTS SLANTED REPORT ON MUMIA ABU-JAMAL
>Sources: REFUSE AND RESIST, "A Case Study in Irresponsible Journalism",
>by
>C. Clark Kissinger and Leonard Weinglass
>        On May 7 and 8, 1998, KGO-TV, an ABC affiliate in San Francisco,
>broadcast a two-part series attacking the international movement to
>prevent
>the execution of Mumia Abu-Jamal. Mumia, a black activist, has been on
>death row in the state of Pennsylvania for 16 years for the killing of a
>Philadelphia police officer in 1981. KGO claimed to do an objective
>review
>of the case. The final broadcast presented a very one-sided story.
>
>PROJECT CENSORED 1998 NATIONAL JUDGES
>
>DR. DONNA ALLEN, president of the Women's Institute for Freedom of the
>Press; founding editor of Media Report to Women; co-editor: Women
>Transforming Communications: Global Perspectives (1996)
>
>BEN BAGDIKIAN,* professor emeritus and former dean, Graduate School of
>Journalism, University of California-Berkeley; former editor at the
>Washington Post; author of Media Monopoly, and five other books and
>numerous articles
>
>RICHARD BARNET, author of 15 books, and numerous articles for The New
>York
>Times Magazine, The Nation, and Progressive
>
>SUSAN FALUDI, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist; author of Backlash: The
>Undeclared War Against American Women
>
>DR. GEORGE GERBNER, dean emeritus Annenberg School of Communications,
>University of Pennsylvania; founder of the Cultural Environment
>Movement;
>author of Invisible Crises: What Conglomerate Media Control Means for
>America and the World, and Triumph and the Image: The Media's War in the
>Persian Gulf
>
>JUAN GONZALEZ, Award-winning journalist and columnist for the New York
>Daily News
>
>AILEEN C. HERNANDEZ, President of Urban Consulting in San Francisco;
>Former
>commissioner on the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
>
>DR. CARL JENSEN, founder and former director of Project Censored;
>author,
>Censored: The News That Didn't Make the News and Why, 1990 to 1996, and
>20
>Years of Censored News (1997)
>
>SUT JHALLY, professor of communications, and executive director of The
>Media Education Foundation, University of Massachusetts
>
>NICHOLAS JOHNSON,* professor, College of Law, University of Iowa; former
>FCC Commissioner (1966-1973); author of How To Talk Back To Your
>Television
>Set
>
>RHODA H. KARPATKIN, president, Consumers Union, non-profit publisher of
>Consumer Reports
>
>CHARLES L. KLOTZER, editor and publisher emeritus, St. Louis Journalism
>Review
>
>NANCY KRANICH, associate dean of the New York University Libraries, and
>member of the board of directors of the American Library Association
>
>JUDITH KRUG, director, Office for Intellectual Freedom, American Library
>Association; editor; Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom; Freedom to Read
>Foundation News; and the Intellectual Freedom Action News
>
>FRANCES MOORE LAPPÉ, co-founder and co-director, Center for Living
>Democracy
>
>WILLIAM LUTZ, professor of English, Rutgers University; former editor of
>The Quarterly Review of Doublespeak; author of The New Doublespeak: Why
>No
>One Knows What Anyone's Saying Anymore (1966)
>
>JULIANNE MALVEAUX, Ph.D., economist and columnist, King Features and
>Pacifica radio talk show host
>
>JACK L. NELSON,* professor, Graduate School of Education, Rutgers
>University; author of 16 books and over 150 articles including Critical
>Issues in Education (1996)
>
>MICHAEL PARENTI, political analyst, lecturer, and author of several
>books
>including: Inventing Reality; The Politics of News Media; Make Believe
>Media; The Politics of Entertainment; and numerous other works
>
>HERBERT I. SCHILLER, professor emeritus of communication, University of
>California, San Diego; lecturer; author of several books including
>Culture,
>Inc. and Information Inequality (1996)
>
>BARBARA SEAMAN, lecturer; author of The Doctors' Case Against the Pill,
>Free and Female, Women and the Crisis in Sex Hormones, and others;
>co-founder of the National Women's Health Network.
>
>ERNA SMITH, chair of the journalism department at San Francisco State
>University, author of several studies on mainstream news coverage on
>people
>of color
>
>SHEILA RABB WEIDENFELD,* president, D.C. Productions, Ltd.; former press
>secretary for Betty Ford
>
>HOWARD ZINN, professor emeritus of political science at Boston
>University,
>author of A People's History of the United States, You Can't be Neutral
>on
>a Moving Train: A Personal History of Our Times and numerous other books
>and articles.
>
>* Indicates having been a Project Censored Judge since its founding in
>1976.
>
>Peter Phillips Ph.D.
>Sociology Department/Project Censored
>Sonoma State University
>1801 East Cotati Ave.
>Rohnert Park, CA 94928
>707-664-2588
>
>March 4, 1999 FILE #044S
>        Contact: Susan Kashack, Director of News & Information
>
>For an electronic copy before March 24, e-mail: censored at sonoma.edu.
> This news release will be posted to www.sonoma.edu/projectcensored on
>March 24.
>
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>
>--
>---------------------------------------------------
>Dan Clore
>
>The Website of Lord Weÿrdgliffe:
>http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9879/index.html
>Welcome to the Waughters....
>
>The Dan Clore Necronomicon Page:
>http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9879/necpage.htm
>Because the true mysteries cannot be profaned....
>
>"Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!"





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