INDUSTRY SEEKS JUDGE'S APPROVAL TO LOG TRACTS

truffler1635 at my-deja.com truffler1635 at my-deja.com
Mon Sep 6 12:06:34 EST 1999


In article <01bef335$bd0d3c10$03f47880 at bob>,
  "Bob Taylor" <rtaylor at ns.net> wrote:
>
>
> <snip>
> > > I suggest that you may be a little preoccupied with mycorrhizal fungi.
> I
> > > don't question their ecological importance, and I don't question their
> > > neglect by the F.S. and the ecological research community.  But to
> suggest
> > > that the spotted owl was chosen as an indicator species because it
> > > disperses fungal spores strains credulity.  It was chosen because it
> was
> > > thought to be an old-growth specialist.
No. Dr. James Trappe was added to Clinton's Forest Plan because of his
expertise in the area. And the spotted owl is not an old-growth
specialist, as you say. But it requires trees larger than 30" diameter
for nesting: something that is rarely found in young plantations. Also,
it is somewhat dependent on the Pileated woodpecker to provide nesting
cavities.
> >
> > Hmmm... I thought it had something to do with how rare that species is.
> >
> Northern spotted owls are not rare.  To my knowledge, they occur everywhere
> in their original range.  No local extinctions have been demonstrated.  The
> only evidence suggesting that they may be threatened comes from banding
> studies that imply, via some very arcane statistics, that population
> numbers are declining.
You mean the recent Forest Service study indicating a population decline
throughout its range? What did you not like about the study?
[snip]

Daniel B. Wheeler
www.oregonwhitetruffles.com


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