TIMBER INDUSTRY EXPLOITS NORTHERN WILDFIRES

Mike H. mhagen at olympus.net
Fri Aug 25 11:43:30 EST 2000


There's another factor which will soon be appearing in utilization specs
- low pulp and small log prices due to oversupply.  They cost to cut and
haul - so contracts get written which boost sale stumpage by leaving
say, any stick of 50, 20 or 10 bf standing or piled on site.  It's a
throwback to the 70's, a high grade and a tinderbox. 

truffler1635 at my-deja.com wrote:
> 
> In article <9evp5.19129$gb.742021 at nntp2.onemain.com>,
>   "Larry Harrell" <fotoware at jps.net> wrote:
> > <truffler1635 at my-deja.com> wrote in message
> > news:8o536k$lkh$1 at nnrp1.deja.com...
> > > The following editorial first ran in The Oregonian, Commentary Page, Aug.
> > > 22, 2000, p B13, and is posted here with permission of the author.
> > >
> > > TIMBER INDUSTRY EXPLOITS NORTHERN WILDFIRES
> > > The harp on roads and clearcutting, but those are just the things that
> > > make for a forest fire
> > >
> > > By THOMAS MICHAEL POWER
> >
> > snip
> >
> > >
> > > Commercial logging and the roads associated with it do not
> > > reduce the threat of wildfire. They do the opposite.
> > > Commercial logging does not remove dangerous fuel loads. Instead it
> > > takes the largest, most valuable and most fire-resistant trees, leaving
> > > behind a firetrap. Commercial logging is not a prescription for forest
> > > health; it is one of the major causes of unhealthy forest conditions.
> > > Until the forest products industry stops trying to insist that
> > > clear-cutting our public lands is necessary for the health of those
> > > lands, we will make no progress in restoring those lands.
> > >
> > > copright 2000, Thomas Michael Power
> > >
> > Commercial logging is not what it used to be. We CAN commercially thin
> > stands of timber, improving wildlife habitat, forest health and fire
> > resistence. Logging small understory trees CAN make a profit AND improve the
> > forests. This week, I took an entire roll of photos on a timber sale I've
> > been working on, utilizing "cut-to-length" logging machines that
> > "surgically" pick and pluck small trees out of the forest, driving over
> > their slash and causing very little soil disturbance. Seeing the finished
> > project, as opposed to the previous condition is really eye-opening.
> >
> > The arguments about today's commercial logging no longer apply because small
> > trees DO make money and the larger, fire resistent trees MUST be left to
> > "save" today's forests. Dombeck's $12 billion proposal to thin out the
> > underbrush and small trees will be a first step towards saving our forests
> > from fire but, those same dynamic forests will need maintenance to keep them
> > healthy and fire resistent.
> >
> > C'mon, people. We need to invest a massive amount into our forests. What do
> > you all think?
> >
> > Larry,     out in the woods everyday
> >
> No argument, Larry. _I_ know that it is possible to thin a stand without
> destroying it. But I'm also aware that the primary incentive in working
> in the woods is profit oriented: and taking small-diameter trees doesn't
> leave much profit margin. Several people I consider smart loggers also
> home in on the larger, more mature trees in order to provide return for
> their labors. (And since they cut exclusively on their own property, I
> have no gripes with them. But I _don't_ think that's a sustainable
> harvest method.)
> 
> It is an opinion that at least some of the smaller diameter logs/saplings
> can be utilized in mushroom growing: things like shiitake, maitake,
> oyster, shimeji, Agaricus sps., Auricularia, and others don't care what
> diameter log they grow on. The key is rapid inoculation methods, which
> translate to a more profitable bottom line.
> 
> Of course, growing mushrooms from such small-diameter logs will cause
> about 20,000 more people to be thinning in the woods for their own
> profit. Then again, they are uninterested in anything over 12 inches
> diameter...
> 
> Daniel B. Wheeler
> www.oregonwhitetruffles.com
> 
> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.






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