Pitch, resins, francinsence and myrrh

truffler1635 at my-deja.com truffler1635 at my-deja.com
Thu Dec 21 11:34:18 EST 2000


In article <3A4218EF.3F6210CF at forestmeister.com>,
  Joseph Zorzin <redoak at forestmeister.com> wrote:
> Bob Carter wrote:
>
> > <truffler1635 at my-deja.com> wrote in message
> > news:91qq58$ag2$1 at nnrp1.deja.com...
> > > In article <nR206.11546$9T2.370670 at nntp1.onemain.com>,
> > >   "Larry Harrell" <fotoware at jps.net> wrote:
> > > > > >Some of the native trees whose aromas I am very fond of are:
> > > > > >Western juniper
> > > > > >Incense cedar
> > > > > >White fir
> > > > > >Grand fir
> > > > > >Subalpine fir
> > > > > >Shasta red fir
> > > > > >Noble fir
> > > > > >Sitka spruce
> > > > > >Western hemlock
> > > > > >Douglas fir
> > > > > >Ponderosa pine
> > > > > >Lodgepole pine
> > > > > >Knobcone pine
> > > > > >
> > > > > >What are yours?
> > > >
> > > > I'm surprised that no one has mentioned Jeffrey Pine with it's strong
> > > > vanilla flavor that many use to identify it. Don't forget the the
> > wonderful
> > > > smell of fresh California Laurel Bay leaves, too.
> > > >
> > > While I know _of_ Jeffrey pine (and probably have driven past it) I
> > > haven't seen it up close and personal. It is not common in my area.
> > >
> > > But I really should have included California laurel (aka Oregon myrtle)
> > > which are used extensively in potpourri along with Western Redcedar
> > > shavings.
> > >
> > > BTW, the best recipe for fresh Dungeness crab uses a single Oregon myrtle
> > > leave in the cooking water. SUPERB!
> > >
> > > Daniel B. Wheeler
> > > www.oregonwhitetruffles.com
> >
> > How about the sap of cottonwood buds?  An incredibly pungent and not
> > unpleasant aroma, this reddish goo has traditional medicinal uses and goes
> > by the name of "Balm of Gilliad."
> >
> > Bob
>
> This discussion has been interesting to me- as I've always felt that North
> America was a paradise before you know showed up with their guns, bibles and
> racissm. The continent really was a paradise of wildlife, beautiful forests,
> clean water, rivers and lakes teeming with fish and waterfowl, all these nice
> smelling organic things and not many people.

There were actually quite a few native Americans, Joe. The Columbia River
valley supported an estimated 200,000 or 300,000 people until the
trappers and g'mnt started handing out blankets with smallpox virus...

Cholera, diptheria, and other water-borne diseases took their toll as
well, along with some of the early influenza strains.

Daniel B. Wheeler
www.oregonwhitetruffles.com


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