The Rainforest Myth

Ted Kegebein kegebein at planttel.net
Sun Jul 2 06:40:22 EST 2000


Karl Davies wrote:

> daugh at home.msen.com wrote:
>
> > Forwarded from the New Paradigms Project [Not Necessarily Endorsed]:
>
> That's good to know.
>
> > From: Ken <ken1 at BRESNANLINK.NET>
> > To: <LA-AGORA at MAELSTROM.STJOHNS.EDU>
> > Subject:      The Rainforest Myth
> > Date: Monday, June 26, 2000 10:39 AM
> >
> > AMAZON.CON -- Part 1
> > Shaky science behind
> > save-rainforest effort
> > New TV documentary finds
> > skeptics among researchers
> >
> > Editor's note: Through a special arrangement with the producers of the
> > television newsmagazine American Investigator, WorldNetDaily brings you this
> > exclusive news report. Part one of this two-part series focuses on questions
> > about the scientific integrity of environmentalists. The series concludes
> > tomorrow in WorldNetDaily.
> > By Marc Morano and Kent Washburn
> > © 2000, WorldNetDaily.com, Inc.
> >
> > Patrick Moore became an instant celebrity in 1977 when a photograph showing
> > him cradling a baby seal in defiance of arrest by Canadian authorities was
> > broadcast around the world.
>
> Fast forward to 2000.  Now he's a big celebrity for providing oral services to
> big timber corporados in British Columbia.
>
> > As the front man for the environmental activist group Greenpeace, he helped
> > turn public opinion around on the high-profile issues of whaling, seal
> > hunting, nuclear power and chemical pollution.
>
> That was then.  This is now: http://www.fanweb.org/patrick-moore/index.shtml .
>
> > Today the environmental scientist and leader of a group called Greenspirit
> > has a new cause -- alerting the public to what he calls the "myth" that the
> > Amazon rainforest is endangered by development and deforestation.
> > "The Amazon is actually the least endangered forest in the world," states
> > Moore in American Investigator's television newsmagazine documentary,
> > "Clear-cutting the myths," hosted by former CBS and CNN newsman Reid
> > Collins. Moore explains that, in the 20 years of warnings about
> > deforestation, "only 10 percent of the Amazon has been converted to date
> > from what was original forest to agriculture and settlement."
>
> Perhaps.  But how much has been high-graded?  That's where you (timber
> corporado) go in, cut the best and leave the rest.
>
> > The finding that the Amazon rainforest threat is a myth based on bad science
> > and political agendas -- especially by unlikely critics such as Moore, other
> > scientists
>
> Moore is not a scientist.  He's a propagandist.

Hmmm...
How can anyone tell, nowadays?

>
>
> > and inhabitants of the region -- is not expected to sit well with
> > a movement that has enlisted schoolchildren throughout the United States and
> > celebrities ranging from Sting to Alex Baldwin to Chevy Chase to Tom Jones
> > and Tony Bennett. And which has also raised tens of millions of dollars for
> > environmental activist groups.
> > "This is where I really have a problem with modern-day environmentalism,"
> > says Moore. "It confuses opinion with what we know to be true, and disguises
> > what are really political agendas with environmental rhetoric. The fact of
> > the matter is: There is a larger percentage of the Amazon rain forest intact
> > than there are most other forests in this world."
>
> Some benchmark.  ALL the world's forests are in sorry shape thanks to the timber
> corporados that fund the likes of Patty Moore.
>
> <snip>
>
> > Philip Stott of the University of London and author of the new book,
> > "Tropical Rainforests: Political and Hegemonic Myth-making," maintains that
> > the environmental campaigns have lost perspective.
> > "One of the simple, but very important, facts is that the rainforests have
> > only been around for between 12,000 and 16,000 years," he says. "That sounds
> > like a very long time, but in terms of the history of the earth, it's hardly
> > a pinprick. The simple point is that there are now still -- despite what
> > humans have done -- more rainforests today than there were 12,000 years
> > ago."
>
> Great, another wonderful benchmark: THE LAST ICE AGE.  But it is good to keep
> things in perspective.  Timber corporados have only been around for what, 100
> years?  Why not wipe them out instead of the rainforests?
>
> > Moore maintains that "the rainforests of the Amazon, the Congo, Malaysia,
> > Indonesia and a few other parts of the world are the least endangered
> > forests" because "they are the least suitable for human habitation."
>
> Perhaps, but they're great for high-grading.  These are exactly the places where
> the big timber corporados want to go in and do their thing.  They have obviously
> funded Moore and Stott to run a little interference for them.
>
> <much more propaganda snipped>
>
> Karl Davies, Practicing Forester
> http://www.daviesand.com






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