(LONG) ENDANGERED WILDLIFE COUNT INCREASES

kmitchell at dudnyk.com kmitchell at dudnyk.com
Thu Sep 28 11:07:32 EST 2000


Just read an article about how to improve habitat of wildlife, including
some endangered species.
Check it out:
http://www.forestryfacts.com/forestry/consumer/facts/imazapyr.asp

In article <8qja0f$r0j$1 at nnrp1.deja.com>,
  truffler1635 at my-deja.com wrote:
> From The Oregonian, Sept. 22, 2000, p C4
>
> ENDANGERED WILDLIFE COUNT INCREASES
> Biologists say the dip doesn't signal a significant threat despite the
> disappearance of several rare plant species
>
> By JONATHAN BRINCKMAN, The Oregonian
>
> 	The number of plants and animals listed as endangered or
threatened
> in Oregon has increased by more than 25 percent in two years, but
federal
> biologists say the state is not facing a new wave of environmental
> threates.
> 	In fact, the protection of old-growth forests through the 1994
> Northwest Forest Plan and new efforts to restore dwindling salmon
stocks
> mean that the odds of saving species could be improving, the
biologists
> said.
> 	"I sense things are a little better," said Lee Folliard, a
> biologists with Oregon's office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
> 	"The overall picture doesn't appear all that bleak," added
Folliard,
> who is assessing the 18 species the office is responsible for
protecting.
> The state office of the Fish and Wildlife Service does not oversee the
> recovery of salmon, steelhead and other marine animals, which are the
> responsibility of the National Marine Fisheries Service. The state
office
> also is not in charge of developing recovery plans for species with
wide-
> ranigng areas such as the bald eagle.
> 	Still, for some species in Oregon the outlook is grim. At the
> greatest risk are the state's 14 threatened or endangered plants. Many
> exist only in scattered populations, mostly on private land.
> 	The federal Endangered Species Act does not prohibit private
> property owners from destroying a listed plant or its habitat. By
> contrast, people who harm listed animals can face fines or prison. The
> result, federal scientists say, is that rare plants are disapperaing.
> 	Andrew Robinson, a botanist with the Fish and Wildlife Service,
said
> he had a wrenching experience this week when he examined one of the
> state's 50 populations of Nelson's checker-mallow. About 200 plants on
a
> farm in Yamhill County had disappeared: The landowner had plowed the
> field.
> 	"I wish we could get cooperation from people to stop this
downward
> spiral," Robinson said.
> 	The five protected plants in the Willamette Valley are at risk
> because most are found in patches of prairie that are disappearing
under
> development and agriculture pressures. One, Kincaid's lupine, has more
> protection than the others becuase an endangered animal, Fender's blue
> butterfly, depends on it. The butterfly lays eggs on the plant, and
its
> larvae eat the leaves.
> 	Because Kincaid's lupine is needed by a protected animal,
destroying
> the plant is prohibited and punishable by fins or imprisonment.
> 	Although trends are downward for six of the 18 species for which
> oregon's Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible, they show signs of
> reversing, Folliard said.
> 	For example, he said, both northern spotted owls and marbled
> murrelets should benefit from increased protection of old-growth
forests.
> Although the Northwest Forest Plan sets aside 7.5 million acres in
> Washington, Oregon and Northern California s old-growth reserves, some
of
> those trees are still young and will only later become suitable for
the
> owls and murrelets, scientists say.
> 	That's why Folliard is optimistic, even though the population of
> marbled murelets, now between 6,700 and 12,000, still appears to be
> declining. The rate of decline of both owls and murrelets is slower
than
> it was before the forest plan was adopted, he said.
> 	Marbled murrelets, listed as threatened in October 1992, are
robin-
> sized seabirds that live their adult lives on the ocean but fly as far
as
> 50 miles inland to lay their eggs on the limbs of old, moss-covered
> trees. Folliard expects marbled murrelet numbers to rise as more
nesting
> sites become available to them.
> 	"A species can still be declining, but we still may have made
> improvements," he said. "We have to give it time for the habitat to
> rebuild."
> 	Eleven populations of protected slamon or steelhead spawn in
Oregon
> waters or pass through Oregon on their way to and from spawning
grounds.
> Although salmon and steelhead stocks throughout the Western United
States
> are generally declining, bioloigsts see some reasons for optimism in
> Oregon.
> 	For one thing, the federal government issued rules this month
> protecting West Coast steelhead and is expected to issue rules in
January
> protecting chinook. In addition, Oregon has developed its own plan for
> restoring salmon and steelhead, and some cities such as Portland also
are
> creating programs.
> 	"Recovery is going to take a long time, with a lot of effort by
a
> lot of people," said Robert Bayley, a fisheries biologists. "But we
can
> start looking at the situation with guarded optimism becuase of the
tools
> wer have coming into play."
>
> SIDEBAR: Endangered and Threatened Species
> 	Oregon ranks fifth among the 50 states for the number of species
> listed as threatened or endangered, with 50 plants and animals
designated
> under the federal Endangered Species Act.
>
> OREGON SPECIES
> Birds
> 	Endangered:	1. Short-tailed albatross
> 			2. Brown pelican
> 	Threatened:	3. Bald eagle
> 			4. Aleutian Canada goose
> 			5. Marbled murrelet
> 			6. Northern spotted owl
> 			7. Western snowy plover
> Fish
> 	Engandered:	8. Borax Lake chub
> 			9. Snake River sockeye
> 			10. Oregon chub
> 			11. Lost River sucker
> 			12. Shortnose sucker
> 	Threatened:	13. Hutton tui chub
> 			14. Foskett speckled dace
> 			15. Spring/summer Snake River chinook
> 			16. Upper Willamette River chinook
> 			17. Lower Columbia River chinook
> 			18. Fall Snake River chinook
> 			19. Columbia River chum
> 			20. Coastal coho
> 			21. Snake River steelhead
> 			22. Lower Columbia River steelhead
> 			23. Upper Willamette River steelhead
> 			24. Middle Columbia River steelhead
> 			25. Warner sucker
> 			26. Bull trout
> 			27. Lahontan cutthroat trout
> Insects
> 	Endangered:	28. Fender's blue butterfly
> 	Threatened:	29. Oregon silverspot butterfly
> Crustaceans
> 	Threatened:	30. Vernal pool fairy shrimp
> Reptiles
> 	Endangered:	31. Leatherback sea turtle
> 	Threatened:	32. Green sea turtle
> 			33. Loggerhead sea turtle
> Mammals
> 	Endangered:	34. Columbian white-tailed deer
> 	Threatened:	35. Canada lynx
> 			36. Steller sea lion
> Plants
> 	Endangered:	37. Marsh sandwort
> 			38. Applegate's milk-vetch
> 			39. Bradshaw's lomatium
> 			40. Rough popcornflower
> 			41. Malheur wire-lettuce
> 			42. Western lily
> 			43. Willamette daisy
> 			44. Gentner's fritillaria
> 	Threatened:	45. Golden paintbrush
> 			46. Water howellia
> 			47. Kincaid's lupine
> 			48. MacFarlene's four-o'clock
> 			49. Nelson's checker-mallow
> 			50. Howell's spectacular thelypody
>
> NUMBER OF SPECIES ON ENDANGERED SPECIES LIST
>
> Alaska		12
> Washington		38
> Oregon		50
> California		288
> Idaho			24
> Nevada		34
> Montana		16
> Wyoming		16
> Utah		43
> Arizona		56
> Colorado		32
> New Mexico		41
> North Dakota	9
> South Dakota	11
> Nebraska		12
> Kansas		15
> Oklahoma		17
> Texas			82
> Minnesota		13
> Iowa			13
> Missouri		24
> Arkansas		27
> Louisiana		28
> Wisconsin		16
> Illinois		25
> Mississippi	41
> Michigan		22
> Indiana		25
> Ohio			24
> Kentucky		42
> Tennessee		90
> Mississippi	41
> Alabama		107
> Maine			13
> New Hampshire	12
> Vermont		8
> Massachusetts	23
> Rhode Island	16
> New York	25
> Pennsylvania	17
> Connecticut	18
> New Jersey		21
> D.C.			3
> Delaware		19
> Maryland		26
> Virginia		63
> West Virginia	20
> North Carolina	61
> South Carolina	41
> Georgia		65
> Florida		111
>
> COMMENT BY POSTER: Considering the interest in Endangered Species and
> their habitat requirements, plus the upsurge in camping and outdoor
> recreation, it seems possible that private recreational/forest/animal
> preserves could be created to allow for public viewing of endangered
> species and a means of expediting their return to non-endangered
health.
> Just a thought.
>
> Daniel B. Wheeler
> www.oregonwhitetruffles.com
>
> Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
> Before you buy.
>


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