growing GIANT SEQUOIA- Sequoiadendron giganteum in India

Larry Harrell lhfotoware at hotmail.com
Fri Dec 13 09:49:44 EST 2002


Pam <grdngal48 at attbi.com> wrote in message news:<3DF94EAD.552AF378 at attbi.com>...
> James wrote:
> 
> > That seems to be the nature of everyone who goes somewhere and sees
> > something growing that is spectacular. ie. To try growing it back home. Go
> > for it. I undestand they succesfully started some in Scotland several years
> > ago. Whether they still survive, I don't know.
> 
> If by several years, you mean 1853, then yes, they can be grown successfully in
> Scotland :-)) There are MANY giant sequoias in Scotland and elsewhere in the
> British Isles, including some very large specimens  - like one that is 150' tall
> with a trunk circumference of 36 feet. They also grow successfully in most parts
> of northern Europe as well as the more temperate portions of eastern Europe. It
> is estimated there are about 10,000 etablished and mature giant sequoias in
> Europe including one that is at the most northerly recorded latitude for the
> species at Songe Fjord in Norway that was planted in the 1880's. There also
> giant sequoias located in Spain (two very large specimens), Turkey, Lebanon,
> Egypt, Israel, Japan, South America, and Austrialia and New Zealand, where they
> thrive.
> 
> With this diversity of locations, questions have been raised about the
> limitation of its native range and habitat. Apparently outside of its native
> Sierra Nevada, the giant sequoia is unable to re-seed itself by natural means.
> 
> I'd second the idea to go for it - in warmer climates the secret for its
> successful establishment appears to be regular and frequent watering.
> 
> pam - gardengal
> 
> 
 Excellent post! I understand that the biggest tree in Europe is a
Giant Sequoia. I second the idea that GS can grow in a multitude of
places. For decades, with liberal watering, the trees can retain that
classic Xmas tree shape, however, when they get older, their tops die
and they get pretty scraggly looking.

Larry



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