growing GIANT SEQUOIA- Sequoiadendron giganteum in India

Stewart Robert Hinsley {$news$} at meden.demon.co.uk
Sat Dec 14 11:57:16 EST 2002


In article <2002Dec14.102242.8264 at jarvis.cs.toronto.edu>, Beverly
Erlebacher <bae at cs.toronto.edu> writes
>
>Cripes.  I *meant* to say "a couple hundred thousand", but I'm off by an
>order of magnitude or two either way.  I shouldn't post late on a Friday
>night after a hard week...
>
>I guess it was the latest advance of the ice (of four in this set) that began
>about 200,000 years ago, or maybe I'm digging myself deeper here...

Digging round the web, I find dates of 2.5m years for the initial global
cooling, 2m years for the Biber stage, 700,000 for Gunz (1st of the
classical 4 stages) and 100,000 for Wurm (latest glaciation).

I seem to recall that the 4 (or 6) ice age model has been superseded,
but I'm not having much success finding references on the web, and I
don't seem to possess any relevant books. (The Milankovitch cycle runs
at around 100kyr, which would make of the order of 20-25 cycles in the
Pleistocene.)

It seems that Antarctic glaciation commenced in the early Oligocene,
approaching 40m years ago, but that glaciation of the coast regions is
more recent.
>
>A few years ago I read a book that had maps showing climatic zones and 
>corresponding dominant flora reconstructed from the fossil and pollen
>record for parts of the Cenozoic.  Way cool.  Unfortunately I can't remember
>the title or authors.

I'd expect there's more than one such book, but I don't personally know
of any. There's a set of sketchy vegetation maps on the BBC "Walking
With Beasts" web site at

        http://www.bbc.co.uk/beasts/changing/paleocene/vegetation.shtml
-- 
Stewart Robert Hinsley



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