Fungi found 1/19/2002 at Paul Bishop's Tree Farm

Daniel B. Wheeler dwheeler at ipns.com
Wed Jan 23 00:42:33 EST 2002


"Rex Swartzendruber" <rex at trufflezone.remove.thisparttoo.com> wrote in message news:<_yi38.6956$l61.25318 at rwcrnsc54>...
> Dan,
> 
> Are you sure that the hypogeous fungi that Arley found is a Picoa sp. novum?
> I have been finding a genus novum in the Coast Range that I thought was a
> Leucangium or Picoa. I took it to the Forest Mycology Lab at OSU. The lab
> assistant identified it as a Picoa sp. novum. Dr. Trappe saw the specimen
> and said that it is a genus novum first collected in 1979. It is yellow/red
> with no ornamentation (warts) on the peridium. The gleba is much like a
> Leucangium or Picoa. The spores are elliptical with no ornamentation. The
> aroma when ripe is very "garlicy" with earthy undertones. I collected enough
> to eat (about 8 pounds) and still have materials for propagation.
> 
The material I saw (I took a digital picture as well) is not as you
describe, Rex. The peridium is rough but not warted; the color is
grayish-brown, not yellow/red; and there was no discernible odor when
I first saw the specimen. The collection was given to Charles LeFevre,
who also identified it as a sp. nov. Picoa.

However, there are several Picoa sp. nov. currently known from Oregon.
And I would not be surprised that you had found a new one. <G> Zelda
Carter found one from Wiley Creek several years ago, and served it at
the NATS potluck. Dr. Trappe asked that future sp. nov. be submitted
for identification before sampling.<G>

The good news is I tried Zelda's Picoa sp. nov., and it was _quite_
good. I suspect yours are likely edible as well. But it would be an
excellent idea to have a verified collection on file. And a collection
of 8 pounds of a sp. nov. is indeed note worthy.

BTW, Leucangium differs from true Picoa in that it has warts. True
Picoa OTOH does not have warts. What you found may differ
significantly from both Picoa and Leucangium.

That's one of the reasons finding truffles in Oregon is at an exciting
stage of development. <G>

Daniel B. Wheeler
www.oregonwhitetruffles.com




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