(none)

Diane Foster DFOSTER at UA1VM.UA.EDU
Sat Aug 24 19:24:05 EST 1991


=========================================================================
Date: 24 August 1991, 18:31:15 CDT
From: Diane Foster              205-556-0340         DFOSTER  at UA1VM
To:   levine at dartmouth.edu

IN REPLY TO KRISTIN

    In reply to Dr. Stall's input 'moveable walls', I recently visited
an older adult (old sod's) community, and was impressed with the
innovations that I saw there.  Knowing that you nor any of the rest of
"US CAREGIVERS" want to remove our parents from there homes; williningly
or not, here are a few suggestions that can help eliminate possible
accidents.  Wall sockets can be raised to a level that requires little
bending.  Cabinets can be lowered to a level that requires little
stretching.  Closets and door entrances can be widened, (this is
especially good for those who use a wheel-chair).  Handles can be placed
around as well as on the tub.  Fixtures can be replaced with large knobs,
this is good for those suffering from arthritis.  Other small handles
should be replaced with large ones.  Heavily textured lanolium can replace
carpets.  Ceilings can be lowered so they won't need a latter to replace
light bulbs.  If they live in a neighborhood with good interpersonal
relationships, a watch person can be used.  It's like that commercial
where the old sod (I'm using this term so freely because as we all know
this is the sterotype given to old sod's) say's "I'm falling and I can't
get up" scenerio.  Some type of intercom system can be installed at the
watch person's home where they are alerted when there is an accident, or
trouble (theft, etc).  In the elder's home make sure system is in easy
reach with a long pull chain.  Preferrably one will be located in the
bath and kitchen where most accidents occur (I can't prove that statement,
just going on what I hear).  My mother has several carts with wheels so
that she can get things from one location to another.  My Mom likes to
put things on the floor.  Recently she fell while bending over to get
something (thank God nothing happened, it didn't develop into a serious
accident) and realized how useful these carts were for her.  While
watering plants she hauls that water around on her cart!  When she takes
her clothes to the laundry room, she hauls them in her cart.  Hope this
has been helpful.
   Ever thought about how your elders' incapcitation might affect you,
your job, your family, love life, ability to get things done?

=========================================================================
Date: 24 August 1991, 19:01:01 CDT
From: Diane Foster              205-556-0340         DFOSTER  at UA1VM
To:   Kristin.J.Levine at dartmouth.edu
=========================================================================
Date: 24 August 1991, 18:31:15 CDT
From: Diane Foster              205-556-0340         DFOSTER  at UA1VM
To:   levine at dartmouth.edu
    In reply to Dr. Stall's input 'moveable walls', I recently visited
an older adult (old sod's) community, and was impressed with the
innovations that I saw there.  Knowing that you nor any of the rest of
"US CAREGIVERS" want to remove our parents from there homes; williningly
or not, here are a few suggestions that can help eliminate possible
accidents.  Wall sockets can be raised to a level that requires little
bending.  Cabinets can be lowered to a level that requires little
stretching.  Closets and door entrances can be widened, (this is
especially good for those who use a wheel-chair).  Handles can be placed
around as well as on the tub.  Fixtures can be replaced with large knobs,
this is good for those suffering from arthritis.  Other small handles
should be replaced with large ones.  Heavily textured lanolium can replace
carpets.  Ceilings can be lowered so they won't need a latter to replace
light bulbs.  If they live in a neighborhood with good interpersonal
relationships, a watch person can be used.  It's like that commercial
where the old sod (I'm using this term so freely because as we all know
this is the sterotype given to old sod's) say's "I'm falling and I can't
get up" scenerio.  Some type of intercom system can be installed at the
watch person's home where they are alerted when there is an accident, or
trouble (theft, etc).  In the elder's home make sure system is in easy
reach with a long pull chain.  Preferrably one will be located in the
bath and kitchen where most accidents occur (I can't prove that statement,
just going on what I hear).  My mother has several carts with wheels so
that she can get things from one location to another.  My Mom likes to
put things on the floor.  Recently she fell while bending over to get
something (thank God nothing happened, it didn't develop into a serious
accident) and realized how useful these carts were for her.  While
watering plants she hauls that water around on her cart!  When she takes
her clothes to the laundry room, she hauls them in her cart.  Hope this
has been helpful.
   Ever thought about how your elders' incapcitation might affect you,
your job, your family, love life, ability to get things done?



Subject:





More information about the Ageing mailing list