Tortoises; was: Re: cryonics & rationalizatio

Allen Smith allens at yang.earlham.edu
Mon May 25 17:32:40 EST 1992


In article <1992May21.111046.19673 at cs.yale.edu>, horne-scott at CS.YALE.EDU (Scott
   Horne) writes:
> In article <1992May18.192342.2084 at athena.cs.uga.edu>, mcovingt at athena.cs.uga.e
   du (Michael A. Covington) writes:
> <In article <PMETZGER.92May18130446 at snark.shearson.com> pmetzger at shearson.com
   writes:
> <
> <>Some tortoises last for at least three to four centuries.
> <
> <Who?  Where?
>
> On Easter Island, I think.  Anyway, this is irrelevant.  The human body,
> no matter how well maintained, simply cannot last for much more than one
> hundred years (I think someone proposed a cap of 115 years) (barring,
> of course, any so-called "nanotechnology").
>
        Are you counting molecular genetics under the category of
nanotechnology? I wouldn't, and it's what I see as the most helpful
possibility. Admittedly, I'm biased; I'm going into molecular genetics.
        -Allen




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