Extending the lifespan: problems and questions

Steven M. Boker smb3u at squeeg.psyc.virginia.edu
Mon May 11 11:18:17 EST 1992


In article <uccsaINN2vg at network.ucsd.edu> tps at chem.ucsd.edu (Tom Stockfisch) writes:
>In article <9204252246.AA00384 at genbank.bio.net> GMP at PSUVM.PSU.EDU writes:
>>There are serious political ramifications to any medical advance.  When we
>>stopped infant mortality in Africa, we introduced famine.
>
>I've heard the exact opposite.
>That reduction of infant mortality is the key to population _control_.
>People keep on having lots of babies until reduction of infant mortality
>gives them the
>confidence that their children are all likely to grow up and be able to
>support them in old age and carry on the family name.

A recent study here at UVa looked at birth rate vs. a wide variety of
possible correlates: nutrition, nurses per capita, per capita income,
the usual things you would think of.  Data was sampled from the world's
"underdeveloped" nations. 

A multivariate regression revealed that the largest loading was on
literacy rate.  The greater the literacy rate, the less the birth
rate.  This is just to say that the problem is more complicated than
simply looking at infant mortality.

Steve

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 #  Steve Boker           #             "Two's bifurcation                  #
 #  smb3u at virginia.edu    #             but three's chaotic"                #
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