Attitudes to life extension via genetic engineering

Rick Abrams ricka at new-orleans.NeoSoft.com
Fri Feb 17 22:41:18 EST 1995


In article <Pine.SOL.3.91.950214212319.18448A-100000 at corona>,
Patrick O'Neil  <patrick at corona> wrote:
>
>
>On Tue, 14 Feb 1995, Peter Merel wrote:
>
>> If you gentlemen would like to read Eric Drexler's books, "Engines of
>> Creation" and "Unbounding the Future" then you might start to bring
>> your speculations into the nineties.  Drexler's no snake-oil merchant;
>> he's a professor at MIT and the instigator and leading light of the 
>> Nanotechnology movement.
>> 
>> Drexler's ideas suggest a future of boundless wealth, opportunity and
>> adventure, not for a few billion, but for trillions. Drexler's science
>
>I know of his fantasies....

Translation: 'I don't want what he wants.'  

>In any case, forget about futurist babble.  In the 20s and 30s, it was
>predicted, quite seriously, that by the 70s EVERYBODY would have their own
>airplane or some version of an aircar.  Futurists are notorious for being
>bad shots.  OK, give us the nanomachines, with limits, but keep your
>trillions in Drexler's own fevered imagination.  Note: being the spawn of
>MIT doesn't prevent one from being a fool nor a fruitcake....

Yeah, and in 1971 when I wanted to take 'Introductory Computer Science' 
CS 104, my college advisor told me to forget it, I was an accounting
major and I'd never touch a computer in my entire life. 

What kind of technical people are US universities turning out today
anyway?
 


-- 
rha




More information about the Ageing mailing list