A Call To Arms

Don Ashley dashley at TENET.EDU
Tue Feb 28 07:43:23 EST 1995


With concensus that research is needed to arrest the aging process comes 
the issue of "What do we do now?"

Do all who are interested and motivated go back and study cell biology 
and genetics.  That would be impracticale for the masses who pick up on 
the concept of 'immortality' via cell perpetuation.

For those who transcend public negativity, must come group effort.  
Collective energies and brainstorming and grass root politics for 
funding research may be productive.  Sitting around and waiting for 
others to alter our destiny is inappropriate for those with vision.

Then there's this 'learned helplesness' thing that was pointed out in dog 
studies.  No matter what is done, no reinforcement.  That's the way it is 
now with many people.  They bought $thousands of anti-aging water 
purifiers, supplements, equipment and still got wrinkles.

So why get up in arms?

Check out the telomerase studies and the rapid developments in genetics and 
nanotechnology.

Solution is at hand.  Funding will bring it years sooner.  Our elders may 
be spared.

Then it gets back to: what do we do now?  

There are a very small number of groups forming in local communities to 
address the issue.  Strategically, some groups avoid getting into product 
endorsement to avoid the 'pyramid scheme', snake oil image.

Their objective is to enlighten the public and to promote research and to 
collect constructive ideas and to pool energies  and resources for this 
potential gift to mankind. 

What are you doing in your community?



On Tue, 28 Feb 1995, John de Rivaz wrote:

> In article: <Pine.3.89.9502261615.A18936-0100000 at Gayle-Gaston.tenet.edu>  
> dashley at TENET.EDU (Don Ashley) writes:
> > Research on anti-aging (immortality via perpetual cell division) has just 
> > as much chance of success as research for cancer, AIDS, std's, athlete's 
> > foot.
> > 
> 
> Many diseases such as cancer affect mainly the elderly. If people did not 
> grow old, ie we found a cure for being elderly, then the incidence of these 
> diseases would be cut with just one research field.
> 
> I suggest that simple economics suggests more money should be spend on basic 
> ageing research.
> 
> 
> -- 
> Sincerely,     ****************************************       
>                * Publisher of        Longevity Report *
> John de Rivaz  *                     Fractal Report   *
>                *          details on request          *
>                ****************************************
> **** What is the point of life if it ends in death? ****
> 
> 
> 




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