IGF-1 & prostate cancer

Ralph L. Samson 73071.20 at COMPUSERVE.COM
Thu Apr 16 07:07:50 EST 1998


Ageing bionet readers,
       The story correlating high IGF-1 levels with incidence of prostate
cancer was a little scary.  Because of my experimentation, research and
analysis relative to a nutritional fat loss approach that works by
stimulating the liver to produce IGF-1, I had some additional information.
I had early surmised that the most likely side effects of this approach
would be from the loss of too much internal body fat.  Relatively recent
results indicate that this can cause deficiencies in the fatty vitamins
and presumably also the fatty antioxidants.  Since antioxidants have
been found to prevent cancers, deficiencies make an individual more
vulnerable to cancer.  Since prostate cancer is the most common cancer
of a non-smoking male, the results make some sense.  The problem should
be able to be alleviated by taking adequate daily supplements of the
fatty antioxidants, Vitamin E and Beta-carotene, along with the other
antioxidants, Vitamin C and Selenium.  One could now argue that the
results provide additional proof of the preventive effects against
cancer of the fatty antioxidants.
       It seems to make more sense to take antioxidant supplements
rather than trying to reduce IGF-1 levels, thus giving up the benefits
of IGF-1.  My antioxidant supplements consist of 25000 IU of
Beta-carotene once a day, 400 mg of Vitamin E and 100 mcg of
Selenomethionine twice a day, and 500 mg of Vitamin C three or four
times a day.
       On a separate note, I recommend reading Thomas J. Moore's
new book "Prescription for Disaster".
Regards, Ralph L. Samson
 





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