Telomeric Theory of Aging

Excelife excelife at earthlink.net
Fri Aug 21 23:59:29 EST 1998


In article <1998Aug20.123428.29969 at jarvis.cs.toronto.edu>, bae at cs.toronto.edu 
says...
>
>In article <6rh6dv$qug$1 at ostrich.cybercomm.net>,
>Jennifer Ann Petersen <jennifer at jenniferpetersen.com> wrote:
>>Beverly Erlebacher wrote in message
>><1998Aug19.135543.14736 at jarvis.cs.toronto.edu>...
>>>Note that the telomerase knock-out mice had normal life spans for *six*
>>>*generations* of steadily decreasing telomere length.  THe only apparent
>>>effect was that the sixth generation was sterile.
>>
>>What did the mice die from?
>
>I don't remember if the paper said, but the important point is that the
>life span was no different from that of the mouse strain that the knock-out
>line originated from.  I don't know what lab mice normally die of.  Boredom?


This paper gives some insight into cause of death in mice, Nippon Eiseigaku 
Zasshi 1996 Jul;51(2):569-578 "[Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): with 
special reference to
age-associated pathologies and their modulation]".


Actually mus musculus and some other mice have an alternative mechanism for 
regulating telomeric length, (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1998 Jul 
21;95(15):8648-8653 "Telomere length regulation in mice is linked to a novel 
chromosome locus.")

No valid conclusions regarding telomeric shortening and life span can be 
drawn from this study.  Other studies determining the effects of the gene(s) 
from chromosome 2 and their interaction with both telomerase and the 
telomeres need to be conducted to help sort out how telomeric length is 
regulated.



Thomas Mahoney, Pres.
Lifeline Laboratories, Inc.
http://home.earthlink.net/~excelife/index.html





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