Nature Article

Paul S. Brookes. brookes at uab.edu
Tue Nov 23 13:09:26 EST 1999


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Randal Parker wrote:-

 >Do you think it possible that we can find whole classes of compounds that
 >upregulate all sorts of antioxdant systems without having to introduce
 >oxidative stresses up in order to do the upregulation?

 >I'm reminded of the supposed beneficial effects of consuming sulfurophane
 >and the speculation that it upregulates enzymes that break down
 >carcinogens. I wonder if compounds could be found or developed that would
 >do this for more kinds of genes that code for free radical handling.

Something that is becoming very clear, and which got a lot of attention at 
the Oxygen Society meeting in new Orleans last weekend, is the notion that 
low levels of oxidants such as NO and H2O2 are beneficial, can inhibit 
apoptosis, and are very effective at inducing antioxidant synthesis 
pathways.  Obviously finding the signaling pathways involved in such 
up-regulation will enable such compounds to be identified - currently NFKB 
is looking like a safe bet.

There was a whole session on free radicals and ageing, and a lot of stuff 
on the role of mitochondria, but nobody mentioned Aubrey's book.  It seemed 
to me that a lot of the work was based on correlations between factor X and 
ageing, but there wasn't really a lot of evidence for cause and effect 
relationships.

I'd recommend the abstract book to anyone (Free Rad Biol Med vol 27 
supplement).   The best question of the conference was in reference to Raj' 
Sohal's work on drosophila longevity....  "these flies that live longer - 
are they any happier?"

Paul


_________________________________________
Dr. Paul S. Brookes.            (brookes at uab.edu)
UAB Department of Pathology,   G004 Volker Hall
1670 University Blvd., Birmingham AL 35294 USA
Tel (001) 205 934 1915     Fax (001) 205 934 1775
http://peir.path.uab.edu/brookes

The quality of e-mails can go down as well as up

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<html><div>Randal Parker wrote:-</div>
<br>
<div>&gt;Do you think it possible that we can find whole classes of
compounds that</div>
<div>&gt;upregulate all sorts of antioxdant systems without having to
introduce</div>
<div>&gt;oxidative stresses up in order to do the upregulation?</div>
<br>
<div>&gt;I'm reminded of the supposed beneficial effects of consuming
sulfurophane</div>
<div>&gt;and the speculation that it upregulates enzymes that break down
</div>
<div>&gt;carcinogens. I wonder if compounds could be found or developed
that would </div>
<div>&gt;do this for more kinds of genes that code for free radical
handling.</div>
<br>
<div>Something that is becoming very clear, and which got a lot of
attention at the Oxygen Society meeting in new Orleans last weekend, is
the notion that low levels of oxidants such as NO and H2O2 are
beneficial, can inhibit apoptosis, and are very effective at inducing
antioxidant synthesis pathways.&nbsp; Obviously finding the signaling
pathways involved in such up-regulation will enable such compounds to be
identified - currently NFKB is looking like a safe bet.</div>
<br>
<div>There was a whole session on free radicals and ageing, and a lot of
stuff on the role of mitochondria, but nobody mentioned Aubrey's
book.&nbsp; It seemed to me that a lot of the work was based on
correlations between factor X and ageing, but there wasn't really a lot
of evidence for cause and effect relationships.</div>
<br>
<div>I'd recommend the abstract book to anyone (Free Rad Biol Med vol 27
supplement).&nbsp;&nbsp; The best question of the conference was in
reference to Raj' Sohal's work on drosophila longevity....&nbsp;
&quot;these flies that live longer - are they any happier?&quot;</div>
<br>
<div>Paul</div>
<br>
<br>

<font color="#000080">_________________________________________<br>
</font><font color="#FF0000"><b>Dr. Paul S.
Brookes.</b>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
(brookes at uab.edu)<br>
</font><font color="#000080">UAB Department of Pathology,&nbsp;&nbsp;
G004 Volker Hall<br>
1670 University Blvd., Birmingham AL 35294 USA<br>
Tel (001) 205 934 1915&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Fax (001) 205 934
1775<br>
<a href="http://peir.path.uab.edu/brookes" eudora="autourl">http://peir.path.uab.edu/brookes</a><br>
<br>
<b>The quality of e-mails can go down as well as up<br>
</font></b></html>

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