Hyalinoecia bilineata

Kristian Fauchald Fauchald.Kristian at nmnh.si.edu
Wed Jun 23 17:24:20 EST 1999


As partially responsible for the old statements maybe I should comment a 
bit.  In the lab in Los Angeles were present a set of "monster-camera" 
pictures taken just off Scripps in about 1000 m depth.  This camera was on 
a high tripod and was pointed at a bait (some fish if I remember correctly). 
It was a time-lapse situation.  One of the truly striking features was that 
after several hours, masses of Hyalinoecia stricta, a very large species, 
came cruising in from all sides, aggregated on the fish, displacing 
amphipods and other fish, and making the whole thing look like one of the 
old stick games.  After a while, it appeared that the worms simply buried 
themselves more or less in situ, but not before essentially all the fish was 
gone.  So, that was at least in part the background for our statements about 
Hyalinoecia.  Hope it helps.  

<Fauchald.Kristian at NMNH.SI.EDU>


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