[Annelida] Id for drift tube cluster?

Geoff Read via annelida%40net.bio.net (by g.read from niwa.co.nz)
Sun Feb 6 17:27:36 EST 2011


Suggestions from Dieter Waloszek:

>>> Dieter Waloszek  02/07/11 9:20 AM >>>
Well, the shelly things on the image could well be lepadomorph
barnacles, and the tubes might be rhabdopleurids or cephalodiscids,
pterobranchs, we call them stomochordates, others name them
hemichordates, in either way are the deuterostomes, little sessile
creatures that have a tentacle crown and produce such tubes with fine
rings. the fossil graptolites should belong in these surroundings all in
the stemline towards the Chordata.

 You might also ask Alex Page, who helped me once for a lecture: "Page,
A.A."   A piece from his email: ..... Cephalodiscus and Rhabdopleura are
both common in the Bahamas, and occasional turn up as living corals in
specialist aquarium/tropical fish shops. Though Rhabdopleura compacta
may be found in UK Waters off Plymouth  .............  is extremely
small compared to its tropical cousins.

For barnacles you might email to Jens Høeg jthoeg from bi.ku.dk , who spent
his life on these creatures, or, likewise, Bill Newman wnewman from ucsd.edu

Hope this helped a little further.
Yours, DIETER

Am 05.02.2011 um 02:57 schrieb Geoff Read:
> Id suggestions sought.
>>>> On 5/02/2011 at 4:36 a.m., Patricia Pocklington
>  wrote
> I received this query from a colleague in Bermuda.
> -----He has made a guess at a “tube worm cluster”.  It is growing
> on a velcro strap that he picked up off the beach in December. He has
> seen the “tubes” at least once before, also on floating debris. The
> barnacle in the picture is 1cm long.
> I don't recognize the tubes but wonder if you would put it on the
> annelid list.  Perhaps someone out there will know which animal built
> the tubes.
> Pat Pocklilngton 


Prof. Dr. Dieter Waloßek
University of Ulm, Biosystematic Documentation
Helmholtzstraße 20, 89081 Ulm, Germany
phone x49-731-5031000, fax 5031009
dieter.waloszek from uni-ulm.de

WEBSITE: http://biosys-serv.biologie.uni-ulm.de/
Center of Orsten Research & Exploration C.O.R.E.: 
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