IUBio GIL .. BIOSCI/Bionet News .. Biosequences .. Software .. FTP

Thanks everyone, for the replies.<br><br>Well, it seems that I was under the impression that the first pair of appendages on <br>S. benedicti were the first pair of branchiae, not palps.&nbsp; So it confused me when&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; the keys I was using described Streblospio as only having one pair of branchiae.&nbsp; I thought
<br>that this either had to be a discrepancy on the part of the keys (highly unlikely) <br>or a discrepancy on the part of the photographers (more likely).&nbsp; <br><br>In our neck of the woods, two common spionids are hard to distinguish if you 
<br>haven't had the epiphany I've had today:&nbsp; S. benedicti and Paraprionospio pinnata.<br>S. benedicti, I think, usually retains its palps and one pair of branchiae whereas P. <br>pinnata usually loses its palps and often loses its last pair of branchiae.&nbsp; When you
<br>have such a case, you get a specimen that looks an awful lot (at first glance) those<br>pictures of S. benedicti you all found on the web.<br><br>Thanks again for being a tremendous resource!!<br><br>Scott Jones<br><br>
<div><span class="gmail_quote">On 1/26/06, <b class="gmail_sendername">Les Watling</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:watling@hawaii.edu">watling@hawaii.edu</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Google images produced only 3 images of this beast. Two were from<br>South Carolina and are of preserved animals where all the color is<br>gone. The third is from University of Delaware and is a beautiful<br>shot of live (?living) worm. The collar is visible as are the brown
<br>and white striped gills.<br><br>don't know about other images of S. benedicti, but you could use the<br>U Del photo as the standard.<br><br>Best,<br>Les.<br><br>At 05:51 AM 1/26/2006, Scott Jones wrote:<br>&gt;Hi all,
<br>&gt;<br>&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; I was wondering if anyone out there is actively photographing<br>&gt; polychaetes under a microscope-- we do it a fair bit in<br>&gt;our lab when we find something 'new.'<br>&gt;<br>&gt;&nbsp;&nbsp; I am specifically looking for images of Streblospio benedicti.&nbsp;&nbsp;I
<br>&gt; am fairly certain that this species is mis-represented in<br>&gt;images on the web.<br>&gt;<br>&gt;thanks for any help,<br>&gt;<br>&gt;Scott Jones<br>&gt;Benthic Ecology Lab<br>&gt;Smithsonian Marine Station, Fort Pierce, FL
<br>&gt;_______________________________________________<br>&gt;Annelida mailing list<br>&gt;Post: <a href="mailto:Annelida@net.bio.net">Annelida@net.bio.net</a><br>&gt;Help/archive: <a href="http://www.bio.net/biomail/listinfo/annelida">
http://www.bio.net/biomail/listinfo/annelida</a><br>&gt;Resources: <a href="http://www.annelida.net">www.annelida.net</a><br><br><br>Les Watling<br>Professor of Oceanography and<br>Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation<br>Affiliate, Yale Peabody Museum
<br>Darling Marine Center<br>University of Maine<br>Walpole, ME 04573<br><br>January to June 2006:<br>Visiting Professor of Zoology<br>University of Hawaii at Manoa<br>Edmondson Hall<br>Honolulu, HI 96822<br>cell phone: 808-772-9563
<br><br><br><br><br></blockquote></div><br>

Send comments to us at archive@iubio.bio.indiana.edu