Postdoc position - John Innes

Robert Sablowski Robert.Sablowski at bbsrc.ac.uk
Wed Jan 5 11:42:36 EST 2000


A postdoctoral position is available at the Molecular Genetics Dept., John
Innes Centre, from February 2000, to work on the roles of NAC genes in
Arabidopsis.

NAC genes were named after the founding members of the family, NO APICAL
MERISTEM, ATAF-1, ATAF-2 and CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDONS 2 (Aida et al., 1997,
Plant Cell 9: 841). These genes encode proteins with a conserved
amino-terminal domain of approximately 150 amino acids (the NAC domain).
Based on the available evidence, NAC proteins are likely transcription
factors. The number of NAC genes in Arabidopsis is estimated at around one
hundred, similar to the size of other major families of transcription
factors (e.g., MYB-like, or AP2-like). The first members of this gene family
were identified in Petunia and Arabidopsis as genes that are necessary for
establishment of the shoot apical meristem and for establishing the
boundaries between developing organs (Souer et al., 1996, Cell 85: 159; Aida
et al., 1997).

The project on NAC genes is part of a large consortium of European
laboratories that are systematically investigating the functions of
transcription factors in Arabidopsis. The NAC project includes a set of
tasks common to all groups in the consortium, such as the identification of
insertional mutants, participating in the assembly of a transcription factor
cDNA array, and contributing to a large scale effort to investigate
interactions between transcription factors in a yeast two-hybrid system. The
successful applicant will interact with a large number of other European
laboratories and have access to resources that cannot be created by
individual labs.

Building on the consortium-related tasks, the project will address specific
biological questions. Our interest in the NAC family originated from the
identification of a NAC gene as a direct target of regulation by floral
homeotic genes (Sablowski and Meyerowitz, 1998, Cell 92: 93). One of our
objectives is to understand the roles of this and other NAC genes during
floral development. The scientific directions of the project, however, will
evolve as further data are obtained from NAC insertional mutants. We
currently have five of these awaiting characterisation.

The position will be available from February 2000 and is funded for three
years. The starting salary will be in the range 17-20 K pounds sterling per
year, depending on experience. The John Innes Centre is an Equal
Opportunities employer.

Candidates please contact:

Dr. Robert Sablowski
Molecular Genetics Dept.- John Innes Centre
Norwich NR4 7UH
United Kingdom

Phone 44-1603-452571 ext. 2530
FAX     44-1603-456844
e-mail:  Robert.Sablowski at bbsrc.ac.uk





Dr. Robert Sablowski
Molecular Genetics Dept.- John Innes Centre
Norwich NR4 7UH
United Kingdom

Phone 44-1603-452571 ext. 2530
FAX     44-1603-456844






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