Post-doc positions in signal transduction

Nobody nobody at hgmp.mrc.ac.uk
Wed Jun 13 12:07:08 EST 2001


<x-rich>POSTDOCTORAL POSITIONS: ANALYSIS OF TWO-COMPONENT SIGNALING ELEMENTS
=46ROM ARABIDOPSIS



Postdoctoral positions are available in the laboratories of Eric
Schaller (Univ. of New Hampshire) and Joe Kieber (Univ. of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill) to work on a collaborative project.  Research
will focus on the functional analysis of two-component signaling
elements such as histidine kinases, response regulators, and
histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins.  These proteins function
in phosphorelays that can transduce a signal from membrane to nucleus.
In Arabidopsis, two-component signaling elements have been implicated
in signaling by cytokinins and ethylene.


Research will employ current molecular, genetic, and proteomic
techniques to identify the signaling pathways in which each gene is
involved, to delineate where the genes are expressed in the plant and
where subsets of the proteins are localized within the cell, and to
determine how these elements interact to achieve specificity in
signaling.


To apply, send a CV, a brief statement of research experience and
research interests, and the names of at least three references
(including address, phone, and email) to either Eric Schaller or Joe
Kieber by mail or email. Candidates should have a Ph.D. and a proven
record of productivity including first-authored publications in
internationally recognized journals. Candidates will be considered for
positions in either lab unless otherwise indicated.


Eric Schaller will be available at the Arabidopsis (June 23-28,
Madison, WI) and Plant Biology (July 21-25, Providence, RI) meetings to
discuss research possibilities with interested candidates.  Please
email if you wish to get together at either meeting.


G. Eric Schaller, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824. Phn (603-862-0565)
Email
(<underline><color><param>0000,0000,00FF</param>egs at hopper.unh.edu</co=20
lor></underline>)

<underline><color><param>0000,0000,00FF</param>http://www.unh.edu/schaller-l=
ab/


</color></underline>Joe Kieber, University of North Carolina,
Department of Biology, CB# 3280, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3280.  Phn
(919-962-2144).  Email
(<underline><color><param>0000,0000,00FF</param>jkieber at unc.edu</color=20
=20></underline>)

<underline><color><param>0000,0000,00FF</param>http://www.bio.unc.edu/=20
faculty/kieber/


</color></underline>Selected References:


Schaller, G.E. (1999) Histidine kinases and the role of two-component
systems in plants. In Advances in Botanical Research (Kreis, M., and
Walker, J.C., eds.). Academic Press, London. 32, 109-148.


<fontfamily><param>Times_New_Roman</param>Gamble, R.L., Coonfield,
M.L., and Schaller, G.E. (1998) Histidine kinase activity of the ETR1
ethylene receptor from Arabidopsis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 95,
7825-7829.


D'Agostino, I.B., Deru=E8re, J. and Kieber, J. J. (2000) Characterization
of the response of the Arabidopsis ARR gene family to cytokinin. Plant
Physiol. 124: 1706-1717


D'Agostino, I. B. and Kieber, J. J. (1999) The emerging family of plant
response regulators. Trends Biochem. 24, 452-456.


Brandstatter, I. and J. J. Kieber (1998) Two genes with similarity to
bacterial response regulators are rapidly and specifically induced by
cytokinin in Arabidopsis. Plant Cell, 10, 1009-1020.</fontfamily>

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