[Arthropod] Re: Arthropod Digest, Vol 5, Issue 6

Teresa Crease via arthropod%40net.bio.net (by tcrease from uoguelph.ca)
Sat Feb 20 14:55:57 EST 2010



The tree in the Reiger et al. paper puts Branchiopoda and Malacostraca together in the Vericrustacea, while insects are the sister group to the Xenocarida (as Darren mentioned).  Thus, Branchiopoda and Malacostraca are more closely related to each other than either group is to the insects.  This does not agree with the hypothesis that branchiopods and insects are more closely related to one another, than branchiopods are to malacostracans , as suggested by the porcelain crab paper.  



Both scenarios are consistent with Pancrustacea, which includes all crustaceans plus insects.  The unresolved question seems to be to which crustacean group the insects are most closely related.  



teri  

Teresa Crease 
Professor and Acting Chair 
Department of Integrative Biology 
University of Guelph 
488 Gordon Street 
Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 

phone: 519-824-4120 x52723 
FAX:   519-767-1656 

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> Today's Topics: 
>    1. Butterfly gene duplication ties extra UV opsin to wing        colors 
>       (Don Gilbert) 
>    2. New crustacean gene set: Porcelain crab transcriptome        paper 
>       (Don Gilbert) 
>    3. Re: New crustacean gene set: Porcelain crab transcriptome 
>       paper (Don Gilbert) 
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 
> Message: 1 
> Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 11:07:14 -0600 
> From: Don Gilbert <gilbertd from bio.indiana.edu> 
> Subject: [Arthropod] Butterfly gene duplication ties extra UV opsin to 
>         wing        colors 
> To: bionet-biology-vectors from moderators.isc.org 
> Message-ID: <KvadnXihrPXfWOPWnZ2dnUVZ_jqdnZ2d from giganews.com> 
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 
> Here is a new study of how bugs are using gene duplications: 
> Butterflies that have a duplicate gene allowing them to see 
> ultraviolet colors also have UV-yellow pigment on their wings. 
>   Positive selection of a duplicated UV-sensitive visual pigment 
>   coincides with wing pigment evolution in Heliconius butterflies. 
>   Adriana Briscoe, Seth Bybee and colleagues. doi:10.1073/pnas.0910085107 
>    
>   We now find that Heliconius erato has a second UV opsin mRNA 
>   (UVRh2)���a previously undescribed duplication of this gene among 
>   Lepidoptera. ... Along with the additional UV opsin, Heliconius 
>   have also evolved 3-hydroxy-DL-kynurenine (3-OHK)-based yellow 
>   wing pigments not found in close relatives ... Functional 
>   diversification of the UV-sensitive visual pigments may help 
>   explain why the yellow wing pigments of Heliconius are so 
>   colorful in the UV range compared to the yellow pigments of close 
>   relatives lacking the UV opsin duplicate. 
>   --------- 
> Daphnia and Aphid have lots of gene duplications. The best 
> general explanation we've found for Daphnia is these are often 
> functionally diversified, even when newly duplicated.  It would 
> be useful to find better ways to study evolution in co-regulated 
> groups of genes, and see where duplication fits in. Do gene 
> duplications offer a cost-effective way to adapt to 
> environments, or differentiate into ecological niches? 
> - Don 
> ------------------------------ 
> Message: 2 
> Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 12:15:53 -0600 
> From: Don Gilbert <gilbertd from bio.indiana.edu> 
> Subject: [Arthropod] New crustacean gene set: Porcelain crab 
>         transcriptome        paper 
> To: bionet-biology-vectors from moderators.isc.org 
> Message-ID: <MIadnfXfcJzESOPWnZ2dnUVZ_jGdnZ2d from giganews.com> 
> This new paper helps flesh out more of the arthropod gene sets: 
> Tagmount A, Wang M, Lindquist E, Tanaka Y, Teranishi KS, et al. (2010) 
> The Porcelain Crab Transcriptome and PCAD, the Porcelain Crab Microarray 
> and Sequence Database. PLoS ONE 5(2): e9327. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009327 
> Among other results here, they support the pancrustacea hypothesis and 
> suggest that branchiopod crustaceans (daphnia) may be more closely related 
> to insects than other malacostracan crustaceans (por. crab). 
> - DOn 
> ------------------------------ 
> Message: 3 
> Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 16:24:36 -0500 (EST) 
> From: Don Gilbert <gilbertd from cricket.bio.indiana.edu> 
> Subject: Re: [Arthropod] New crustacean gene set: Porcelain crab 
>         transcriptome        paper 
> To: dobbard from staffmail.ed.ac.uk, gilbertd from bio.indiana.edu 
> Cc: arthropod from magpie.bio.indiana.edu 
> Message-ID: <201002192124.o1JLOab20847 from cricket.bio.indiana.edu> 
> Darren, 
> This Porcelain crab transcriptome is compared to only Daphnia and two insects 
> (in the figure I looked at), so it is much narrower in species scope than that 
> recent Arthropod phylogeny paper. On the other hand it is comparing 19,000 EST 
> clusters (~genes), whereas the Nature paper compared only ~60 genes.  My take, 
> and I'm not a phylogenist, is these are both accurate interpretations of their 
> data, but neither is a complete or final determination of the phylogenies. 
> We need more data for that :) 
> I just took another look at the phylo tree in Regier et al Nature paper and 
> it seems in agreement with malacostracan (crab) being more distant from 
> insects than branchiopoda (daphnia). 
> -- Don 
> |From dobbard from staffmail.ed.ac.uk  Fri Feb 19 16:01:30 2010 
> |Date: Fri, 19 Feb 2010 21:01:14 +0000 
> |From: Darren Obbard <dobbard from staffmail.ed.ac.uk> 
> |To: Don Gilbert <gilbertd from bio.indiana.edu> 
> |Subject: Re: [Arthropod] New crustacean gene set: Porcelain crab 
> |        transcriptome paper 
> | 
> |> Among other results here, they support the pancrustacea hypothesis and 
> |> suggest that branchiopod crustaceans (daphnia) may be more closely related 
> |> to insects than other malacostracan crustaceans (por. crab). 
> | 
> |Does this mean we don't believe "Xenocarida as the long-sought sister   
> |group to the Hexapoda"?   
> |http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/pdf/nature08742.pdf 
> | 
> | 
> | 
> |-- 
> |Darren Obbard 
> |Institute of Evolutionary Biology 
> |Ashworth Labs 
> |Kings Buildings 
> |University of Edinburgh, UK 
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