Resound Power hearing aid and children

Jeffrey G. Sirianni sirianni at uts.cc.utexas.edu
Mon Oct 30 01:23:55 EST 1995


In article <471b5o$8jd at sundog.tiac.net>, dehahn at tiac.net (Christofer deHahn) says:
>
>
>My profoundly deaf 4.5 year old is going to be starting a trial with the
>Resound Power hearing aids soon. He has a 90dB PTA and uses his residual 
>hearing well. His current aids are Phonak PicoForte PPC-P set at 60DB of 
>gain.
>
>I've searched the net for info but came up empty. I'd appreciate any info 
>on these aids, both technical and anecdotal, especially regarding fitting 
>them to young children. I've already applied for the second mortgage on 
>the house 8^).
>
>Thanks
>
>Chris 
>

ReSound hearing aids function on two basic principles.  The first is that
linear amplification does not take into account the effects of "abnormal
growth of loudness" or recruitment, which is almost always present in
sensorineural hearing loss.  Their aids differ in that they utilize a gain
adjustment technique called full-dynamic range compression.  In effect, the
aids adjust the amount of gain according to the level of the input signal
(low input, high gain; high input, low gain).  The theory behind this strategy
is that sound will remain comfortable and audible at all input levels.  The
second principle is that these aids amplify via two channels, so that this
compression technology can be individually set for a low and high frequency
band, depending on the hearing loss.

I have one patient who uses the ReSound BTP's and she is a but older than your
son,  In fact she is 100 years old.  She went from being non-communicative, head
down in her wheelchair, to a person with her head up following and participating
in every conversation.  It has done well with her, but I can in no way predict
what it will do for your son.

Since Phonak PicoForte PPC-P are very good hearing aids themselves, I really
wonder if you will notice a difference in your son's ability to use his
residual hearing.  Be sure to fully evaluate the aids during the trial period
before deciding that you want to keep them.

In addition, be aware that the ReSound 3 year warranty covers repair due to normal
usage.  They do not cover loss and damage (we all have our own stories concerning
what kids have done to hearing aids).  There are insurance policies for ReSound;
I personally like ESCO over Midwest.

Good luck and PLEASE keep the group informed on your experience. 

Jeff Sirianni     @(((<{
University of Texas at Austin
Communication Sciences and Disorders
CMA, 2nd Floor Clinic
Austin, TX  78712-1089
sirianni at uts.cc.utexas.edu
jgsaudio at aol.com

{MY SIGLINE IS BACK... :-) }



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