RF or ultrasound induced tinnitus?

Ken Tough objectech at objectech.co.uk
Tue Jan 30 13:31:46 EST 1996


In article <DLp2tq.1pL at liverpool.ac.uk>, Roger Brooks
<rsb at liverpool.ac.uk> writes
[...]
>Since then I have noticed that after a week or two away from work, the
>tinnitus seems to disappear (or at least is considerably reduced).  After
>one or two days back at work it returns.  This was particularly noticeable
>after the Christmas/New Year holiday, and I am looking for some kind of
>environmental factor.  My new office is in the same building, and only a
>short distance from the old one.  The background noise level in my office
>is quite low, in fact it is probably quieter than the old one, as it has

  Here is your cause, most likely. Tinnitus is perceived sound which
(generally) does not arise from vibration in the outer/middle/inner ear.
So, its perception is masked by actual sounds coming in the "normal
way".  The perceived "loudness" of a sound is not the same as the level
which a mechanical meter would detect.  Given the fact that tinnitus
is not an actual sound anyway, then the perceived loudness can actually
vary to any degree.  When it is >really< quiet, everyone will hear 
some form of tinnitus.

Anyway, what I'm saying is I think it is because your office is quiet.
A simple test would be to have a quietly playing radio on your desk.
See if you notice less tinnitus during the day that way.  (For 
severe cases, there are hearing aids which put tones or "coloured
noise" into the ear, for masking.)

>double glazing.  However I am suspicious of a microwave dish which is
>mounted outside the building directly above my desk.  I am going to get the

And another thing...  Thinking tinnitus it makes it worse.

I know it can be a very debilitating problem, and there are no easy
solutions.  Hope it gets better.


-- 
Ken Tough

Turnpike evaluation. For information, email: info at turnpike.com



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