Bibliographic software

Richard P. Hershberger HERSH at MACC.WISC.EDU
Sat Feb 20 21:14:00 EST 1993


Adding my two cents...
     When I compared Mac bibliographic software about 4 years ago, my lab
settled on EndNote because of the way it handled reformating of citations
within a manuscript.  While in the word processor writing, you open the EndNote
DA or application, do whatever searching or last minute editing you need
(looking for just the right reference) and simply cut and paste the reference,
you want to cite, putting it where the citation (number, author-date, etc.)
will be in the final manuscript.  This places a temporary citation in your text
identifying the reference (displayed by Author, Date, and a number, so you
still know which reference is which).
     When you finish your manuscript, you have the EndNote application reformat
the manuscript according to the style of the journal you're submitting to.
EndNote converts all those temporary citations throughout your manuscript into
citations, either numbered in alphabetical order or by order of appearance, or
author-date, etc.  If, god forbid, you have to (or let's say "choose to")
submit your manuscript to a different journal, your take your original file and
have EndNote format in a different style.
     In summary, we found that EndNote had significant advantages with regard to
how you can use its database functions while you're writing, and how it formats
citations throughout a manuscript, not just creating a bibliography at the end
of a manuscript.
     Of course this was of 4 years ago!  If the other programs (ProCite,
Reference Manager) have adopted these features, please let me and everyone else
know.
 
   /\       R I C H A R D   P.   H E R S H B E R G E R,   P H. D.
  /^^\   Institute for Molecular Virology      UW-Madison, WI 53706
 /^^^^\  hersh at macc.wisc.edu * RPHrshbrgr at aol.com * Fido 1:121/6.18
 ^^||^^  "Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed".  -Francis Bacon




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