Mac or PC ?

William R. Pearson wrp at dayhoff.med.Virginia.EDU
Fri Nov 25 11:57:27 EST 1994


In article <3aq55b$qs5 at lyra.csx.cam.ac.uk>,
Tim Cutts <tjrc1 at cus.cam.ac.uk> wrote:
>dehais at next9.lirmm.fr (Patrice DEHAIS) writes:
>
>>It s just for an opinion poll.
>
>>I work in a laboratory specialized in genetics. We have to change all  
>>our old personal computers (old PC running DOS) and buy new machines. 
>
>>Now with Windows, the two environments are both user friendly. But  
>>today, is there more good useful software in genetics for PC/Windows or  
>>for Mac ? And what about tomorrow ? 
>
/* much deleted */
>I think the PC is also superior for connectivity.  Networking
>macintoshes is expensive, unless you buy an expensive macintosh with
>built-in ethernet.  If you will need to connect to remote hosts (for
>example, my groups use an SGI machine running the Staden and GCG
>packages), the PC stands out.  I can use my PC as a dedicated
>X-terminal to the remote machine.  My fellow lab workers on their
>macintoshes cannot.  There are X servers for Macs, but they are
>supposed to be awful.  After all, X requires three mouse buttons, so
>you're onto a loser from the word go...
>

I would say just the opposite.  Networking hardware and software is
built into the Mac - getting the same functionality with DOS/Windows
is very difficult and prone to break.  If you want to run Mosaic
clients, Xwindows, Nentrez, while running programs from a network and
moving files back and forth, the Mac is the way to go.  No interrupt
conflicts, no running out of sockets, etc etc.  Our local computer
center can get a Mac networked and running the common network programs
in a matter of minutes over the phone.  With DOS/Windows, someone must
physically load and configure software drivers, check other boards,
reconfigure NET.CFG, etc, etc.  There is no comparison.

I spend >8 hours a day running MacX (and Nentrez, Fetch, etc.) and I
have been completely satisfied. (I bought a 3-button mouse, big deal.)
I can even change the resolution of my monitor on the fly for extra
large (or small) windows.  For networking, the Mac cannot be beat.

Bill Pearson

-- 
wrp at virginia.EDU
Dept. of Biochemistry #440
U. of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22908




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