Scientific database

John Michael Sauder sauder at polaris.fccc.edu
Tue Oct 14 09:34:17 EST 1997


In article <B064305F966819E27 at asd05-25.dial.xs4all.nl> a_team at dds.nl (A-team) writes:
>In article <61j1dr$bod at mserv1.dl.ac.uk>,
><IZEMAN at fns.uniba.sk> wrote:
>
>>I am looking for suitable database able to import refs in MEDLINE format. 
>>It could run on MS-DOS (that one may be sufficient because we don't have 
>>all PCs with Windows 95), or Windows 3.1 or Windows 95.
>>
>>Does anyone know internet site for free copy of an database program
>>suitable for scientists ?
>
>FileMakerPro. (www.claris.com) If you save the refs as tab-separated text,
>ard

	I know of no free programs.  
	However, I would HIGHLY recommend EndNote Plus with EndLink, by 
Niles & Assoc.  http://www.niles.com.   (I do not work for them  -- just
a satisfied customer)

	Endlink allows you to directly import search results from Medline 
or just about any other database into an EndNote library.  The import
filters can be modified to include/exclude exactly the information you
want/don't want.  

	Searches can easily be done in EndNote, either field-specific
(like author, title, year, keywords, abstract, etc), or across all
fields in a given recond.  AFAIK, EndNote can work with libraries 
containing tens of thousands of references.  The libraries are 
readable on either PC (Win3/95) or Mac.  There are older versions of
EndNote/Endlink that run under DOS, but I would recommend sticking with 
the newer versions.

	EndNote's greatest power, in my opinion, is its seemless
integration with MS-Word/WordPerfect.  As you're writing a paper, you 
can include citations to references in your EndNote library.  After 
your paper is done, Endnote will format the citations in your paper 
based on any journal style you select/design (Science, Nature, Cell, 
etc), also creating the entire list of references at the end of the 
paper according to which style you've selected.




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