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Biofilm Treatment with Polymers

David B. Hedrick davidbhedrick at icx.net
Mon Jul 19 11:11:16 EST 1999


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NNTP-Posting-Date: 13 Jul 1999 23:12:46 GMT 
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My goodness, Cindy. 
We have a large number of bacteria, and other organisms, attached to a 
surface. What else is required for it to be considered a biofilm? I 
think your response was rather arch and superior. I hope you had fun, 
"correcting" my "proposition", and acusing me of "insinuating". If 
you're going to be caustic, at least spell my name correctly. 
I was speaking informally, encouraging her to investigate other types 
of biofilms, or whatever you want to call microorganisms attached to 
surfaces. It wasn't for publication and I don't think I deserved your 
nastyness. 

> In his response to Mary's question, DB Hendrick states that: 
> >"Plant leaves have a biofilm called the phyllosphere. Plant roots, the 
> >rhizosphere (or rhizoplane, I can never remember). 
> >Your skin, as well as every body orifice, has it's own microbial 
> >community. " 
> 'Phyllosphere', 'phylloplane', 'rhizosphere', 'rhizoplane', ARE NOT 
> biofilms. "Phyllo" is the Greek combining form for leaf, "rhizo" for root, 
> and the more familiar words "plane" for surface and "sphere" for (you 
> guessed it!!) sphere. Hence, rhizoplane is the root surface. The rest of 
> them you can figure out for yourselves. 
> To more correctly state his proposition, DB Hendrick could have said that 
> the phylloplane of numerous plants harbor large populations of 
> micro-organisms (up to ca. 10E8 per leaf), of which some may be aggregated 
> into biofilms. But, the vast majority of the phylloplane (about 90-98%) is 
> virgin territory. The presence of biofilms in the rhizosphere is less well 
> known, but the rhizosphere harbors a rich microbial population. 
> Furthermore, DB Hendrick also insinuates that microbial community = biofilm. 
> Perhaps it is very likely that the organisms assembled in a biofilm function 
> as a community; but just because that organisms function as a community 
> does not imply that they are biofilms!! 
> Sorry to be so severe, but I think that a professional technical writer 
> should be a bit more careful in use of terminology. 
> 
> Sincerely 
> Cindy E. Morris 
> INRA - Station de Pathologie Vegetale 
> B.P. 94 
> 84143 Montfavet, France 
> tel : (33) 490-31-63-84 
> fax : (33) 490-31-63-35 
> e-mail : morris at avignon.inra.fr 
> 
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-- 
~DBH
Technical writing, literature search, and data analysis at the interface 
of chemistry and biology. 
davidbhedrick at icx.net
David B. Hedrick 
P.O. Box 16082 
Knoxville, TN 37996

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