(NONE)

Rook, Tony Tony_Rook at steris.com
Mon Jul 2 13:27:23 EST 2001


Mr. Tiyawisutsri:

There is a plethora of research in the area of the biofilm matrix otherwise 
referred to a the bacterial glycocalyx.  Here are some pertinent references 
in this area (although there is much more):


1.      Costerton JW, Irvin RT, Cheng KJ.  The Bacterial Glycocalyx in 
Nature and Disease.
         Ann. Rev. Microbiol.  1981.  35: 299-324.

2.      Marshall KC.  Mechanisms of Bacterial Adhesion at Solid-Water 
Interfaces.  In: Bacterial Adhesion:  Mechanisms and      Physiological 
Significance (eds.  Savage DC, Fletcher M).  Plenum Press, New 
York.  1985.  pp 133-161.

3.      Sutherland IW.  Microbial Exopolysaccharides - Their Role in 
Microbial Adhesion in Aqueous Systems.  CRC Critical       Reviews in 
Microbiology.  Volume 10, Issue 2: 173-201.

4.      Allison DG.  Biofilm-Associated Exopolysacharides.  Microbiology 
Europe.  Nov/Dec 1993. pp 16-19.

As for your specific questions:
         1. How to distinguish bacterial exopolysaccharide from biofilm 
exopolysaccharide?

                 In the first above reference, Costerton et al defines the 
bacterial glycocalyx as "those 
polysaccharide-                        containing structures, of bacterial 
origin, lying outside the integral elements of the outer membrane of 
Gram-          negative cells an the peptidoglycan of Gram-Positive cells"1.

         2. Is EPS a minor component of biofilms?

                 There are several studies which have investigated the 
exopolysaccharide content of biofilms.  These should 
give                 you some idea of the content ratios of EPS to other 
biofilm components such as bacterial cells.

         3. Are there specific biofilm exopolysaccharides?

                 Although there are major polysaccharide groups involved in 
biofilm formation, much of the specific EPS                  composition is 
dependent on the microorganisms within the biofilm that is generating the 
EPS.  The composition          and ratios of different exopolysaccharide 
produced are not only dependent of the specific bacterial 
cell                        producing them but is also influenced by 
physical conditions ( i.e. influence of substratum, flowing 
conditions,                and available nutrients).  Much of this is 
detailed in the cited references listed above.

Hope this helps,

Tony A. Rook
Scientist
STERIS Corporation
5960 Heisley Road
Mentor, OH 44060  USA
Phone: (440) 392-7743
Email:  tony_rook at steris.com


-----Original Message-----
From: "rachaneeporn tiyawisutsri" [mailto:rachaneeporn_t at hotmail.com]
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2001 5:15 AM
To: biofilms at net.bio.net
Subject: (NONE)



Hello all, I am a graduate student in Medical technology at Mahidol
University. I will have a seminar in " The biofilm matrix" . Please suggest
me about the content. And I have some question about " How to distinguish
bacterial exopolysaccharide from biofilm exopolysaccharide ?" ,
Exopolysaccharide is the minor component of the bacterial biofilm? and the
last question " Are there any specific biofilm exopolysaccharide ?
Thanks for help

Rachaneeporn Tiyawisutsri
_________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com.
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