Computational Biology -- Fall Conference

JF600 at albnyvms.bitnet JF600 at albnyvms.bitnet
Fri Jun 1 08:27:00 EST 1990


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                         CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT

            "CONVERGING APPROACHES IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY"

                         SEPTEMBER, 13-16, 1990

                          RENSSELAERVILLE, NY



        An interdisciplinary meeting on "Converging Approaches in
Computational Biology" will be held September 13-16, 1990 in Rensselaerville
near Albany, New York, under the auspices of the Center for Molecular
Genetics of the State University of New York at Albany.  The concept of the
meeting reflects an increased awareness within the scientific community that
computational tools being developed in diverse fields have common elements or
close analogies. The aim of the conference is to identify these elements and
to facilitate an exchange among computational biologists that is not normally
possible within the constraints of topical, single-discipline meetings.

        The meeting will bring together about 100 scientists working in a
wide range of disciplines (such as x-ray crystallography, electron
microscopy, sequence analysis, neurophysiological signal processing) with the
purpose of encouraging interdisciplinary exchange on underlying concepts of
mathematical modeling and techniques of numerical analyses in biology.  To
this end, the meeting is organized into sessions according to particular
mathematical or computational themes: Latent Feature Identification,
Information Theoretical Approaches, Methods for Reconstruction and
Refinement, Simulations and Modelling, Discovery of Patterns.


CONFERENCE SITE

        The conference, one of the Albany Conference series held annually
since 1984, will take place at the Rennselaerville Conference Center, located
30 miles southwest of Albany, NY in the Helderberg Mountains.  The Institute
offers on-campus facilities including a large auditorium with all necessary
audio-visual equipment, and smaller conference halls for informal workshops
and poster sessions.  The Weathervane Restaurant, located on-campus and
formerly the carriage house of the Huyck estate, provides meals and
refreshments, while overnight lodging is available in the modern and classic
estate houses. Rooms are assigned in advance to registrants, and
transportation to and from Rensselaerville is provided from the airport, as
well as train and bus stations.  The rural, secluded setting of the
conference, the limited number of participants and the scheduling of sessions
in the morning and the evening -- leaving the afternoons free -- are intended
to facilitate informal discussions among conference participants.


CONFERENCE FORMAT

        The conference will consist of three morning and two evening sessions
over a period of three nights and days (Thursday evening through Sunday
morning).  Each session will be devoted to a particular computational theme
and will be comprised of four or five 30-minute talks by experts from
different biological disciplines (with strong representation from structural
biology), interspersed by question-and-answer periods of 15-20 minutes.
There will be an open-ended discussion period at the end of each session,
with the speakers and chair serving as a panel.


CONFERENCE PROGRAM

        The following is a summary (as of May 25) of the sessions planned
for the meeting on Computational Biology.  All of the speakers and most of
the session chairs are indicated.


SESSION 1. METHODS FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND REFINEMENT

Chair: Dr. Mario Amzel, Johns Hopkins University

Speakers:

Dr. Sarah Nelson        Fox Chase Cancer Center
Peaks, patterns and protein structures from high resolution NMR spectra

Dr. A.B. Goncharov      Academy of Sciences, USSR
Determination of angles among randomly oriented particles of unknown structure

Dr. Lynn Ten Eyck       General Atomics
Image reconstruction and model refinement in protein crystallography

Dr. John Kuriyan        Rockefeller University
Application of molecular dynamics to crystallographic refinement of
proteins


SESSION 2. INFORMATION THEORETICAL APPROACHES

Chair: Dr. Andrew McLachlan, Univ. of Cambridge

Speakers:

Dr.  Joel Trussel       North Carolina State Univ.
Set theoretic approaches to estimation and identification

Dr. Michael Unser       National Institutes of Health
Optimum resolution conversion and scale-space representation of images

Dr. Bi-Cheng Wang       Univ. of Pittsburgh
Resolution of phase ambiguity in macromolecular crystallography by a
noise filtering process

Dr. Temple Smith        Dana Farber Cancer Inst.
Identification of functional pattern correlates


SESSION 3. LATENT STRUCTURE IDENTIFICATION

Chair: Dr. Fred Cohen, Univ. of California, San Francisco

Speakers:

Dr. Pat Argos           European Molecular Biology Laboratory
Comparing protein sequences, sensitive methods and realistic
evaluations

Dr. Peter Franaszczuk   University of Maryland
Direction of postsynaptic potentials in intracellular recordings
from neurons in tissue culture

Dr. Joachim Frank       Wadsworth Center, NYS Health Dept.
Classifying noisy projections of an unknown structure

Dr. Charles Lawrence    Wadsworth Center, NYS Health Dept.
Analysis of misaligned data with application to sequence analysis
and neurophysiology

Dr. Gary Stormo         Univ. of Colorado
Identifying functional domains in biological sequences


SESSION 4. SIMULATIONS AND MODELLING

Speakers:

Dr. Ken Dill            Univ. California, San Francisco
Statistical mechanics of protein folding

Dr. Jeff Skolnick       Scripps Research Inst.
Models of globular protein folding

Dr. Richard Feldman     National Institutes of Health
Could we ever design a biology

Dr. Kathleen Palmer     Cornell University
Modelling "loops" of proteins: homology and energy-based methods
and applications


SESSION 5. DISCOVERY OF PATTERNS

Speakers:

Dr. Alan Lapedes        Los Alamos National Laboratory
Neural nets, optimization and statistics: a biological case study

Dr. Michael Liebmann    Amoco Technology Co.
Application of neural networks to structure-function analysis in
proteins

Dr. Teresa Webster       Arris Pharmaceutical
Identification of structure/function patterns using amino acid
sequence information

Dr. Andrew McLachlan    Univ. of Cambridge
Periodic structural patterns in proteins


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REGISTRATION  INFORMATION

CONFERENCE FEE: $450 includes registration, accomodations (double occupancy),
meals and transportation between the conference center and Albany airport.  A
limited number of single occupancy accomodations are available for an extra
$100.  Payment of the full fee will be required by AUGUST 23, 1990.  Please
note that neither the Albany Conferences nor the Rensselaerville Conference
Center accepts credit cards.

APPLICATION DEADLINE: July 30, 1990.

For further information and a copy of the application form for the 1990
Albany Conference on "Converging Techniques in Computational Biology", please
call the conference coordinator, Carole Keith, 518-442-4327, FAX
518-442-4767, or write to The 1990 Albany Conference, P.O. Box 8836, Albany,
NY 12208-0836.






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