paba dmae cancer

Allen Smith allens at yang.earlham.edu
Fri Apr 17 12:58:11 EST 1992


In article <31544 at sdcc12.ucsd.edu>, jtucker at sdcc13.ucsd.edu (Joe T. Ucker       ) writes:
> 
>   
> 	I've received a few letters and have seen a brief discussion
> 	without any sort of resolution on the rumour I posted sbout
> 	DMAE, it's solvent and cancer.  A reader contacted twinlabs
> 	(tm) and stated the nervous operator shakily confirmed that
> 	the only solvent that they used with their DMAE was water.
> 
> 	I recently found a DMAE bottle in a healthfood store and
> 	found the DMAE in TWinlabs to be in  a PABA (para-amino ben-
> 	zoic acid) base.  The solvent is indeed water.  
> 
> 	So I checked out the biomed libraries' reports on PABA.  I
> 	found a few reports of similar substances being
> 	carcinogenic.  I'm an amateur and I don't have these
> 	articles handy, but I believe these were pyrridines.  I
> 	found Peter Alex the med student on the shuttle today and
> 	he suggested the benzoic acid was the problem.  He 
> 	said that it is hypothesized that benzene itself is the
> 	culprit in causing cancer.  We talked a little about the
> 	chemical structure and the floating electrons of the 
> 	benzene ring and the efficacy of this structure in fucking
> 	with DNA replication.  Benzene is the same thing responsible
> 	for the potent carcinogenic activities of burnt barbeque
> 	meterial which is basically just a clump of benzene riings.
> 	
> 	The journals were mostly unreadable to this novice but 
> 	by the availability of benzocaine, sunscreens containing
> 	benzene-type chemicals (which react with UV light to create
> 	free raqdicals) that this issue is either unresolved or
> 	not yet critical (as the journals seemed to suggest- in-
> 	conclusive.)  PATMS (peter alex the med student) believed
> 	the necessity of these products in medical practices
>         currently outweighs their dangers.  This didn't make sense
> 	to me, aS the use in suncreen is to PREVENT cancer while
> 	he claimed these same substances CAUSED cancer.
> 
> 	Maybe this shouldn't be taken all that seriously.  But
> 	I'm sure a few others as well as myself would appreciate
> 	it if a more biochemically-minded reader could make sense
> 	of this and give a few words to the newsgroups.
> 
	Although I'm familiar with that benzene is linked to cancer, I 
can't  find any references immediately available which say anything more 
than that. I've cross-posted this to a few other newsgroups whose readers 
may be able to help.
	-Allen



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