Ethics in research question

Wade Hines hines at socrates.ucsf.edu
Mon Aug 16 00:01:59 EST 1993


mhollowa at nyx.cs.du.edu (Michael Holloway) writes:

>I'd like to have a wide range of feedback on a question of ethics in 
>research and researcher collegiality.  Hypothetically, you 

best to attemt humor, ethics in research: military intelligence etc ...

<snip>

>The advisor goes and presents the grad student's 
>preliminary data.  

Here it comes ...

>Both labs publish separate papers.

Analysis: Mistake 1. The first example of anything in writing is the
published paper. 

Rule 1. Always get details of a collaboration in writing, 
including a possible outcome such as paper titles if things go well.
Don't let anyone bully you out of this. Be sly, be smooth, get it in
writing.

>(one lab) assures the (other) lab ...

>Surprise, months later (one) lab calls to say ... done ... too!

But were you really suprised?

Rule 2. Don't be suprised.
Rule 3. See part about not being bullied in Rule 1.

Now what do you do if you do get the scatolocially relevent end of
the stick? Be smart. The other lab can probably still hurt you and
won't mind: that's the way they play. Let the word get out but don't
get yourself labeled a crybaby in the process. Remember; don't do the
same to others; don't let anyone do it to you again. 

If you feel really vidictive. Read all their papers and find some 
stupid mistakes they've made and expose them through dazzling work
of your own. Or, get a life, give up science for a profession with
less cut-throat persons of questionable parentage. Like a lawyer maybe.
--Wade



More information about the Bioforum mailing list