Ethics in research question

Paul S. Winalski winalski at adserv.enet.dec.com
Thu Aug 19 10:19:31 EST 1993


In article <CBz4zG.830 at world.std.com>,
jamcorp at world.std.com (Jonathan Priluck) writes:
|>
|>	Hey guys; its a cold cruel world!  When I went to school I was older
|>and wiser than my fellow students.  When I made an important discovery in
|>1989 I patented it immediately.  I did not inform the university, my
|>advisor, or anyone else, I just applied for the patent under my name because
|>it way my idea and nobodys bussiness.  About 18 months later (just one month
|>after I received my patent fron the Patent Trademark Office) the university
|>realised what I had and suddenly my project belonged to the university.
|>They still did not know I had a patent on the process, so I played it cool.
|>I argued with the university about who would get credit and in general was
|>very urbane but insiustant.  In the end the University in its arrogance took
|>the project away from me and assigned it to one of their profs to start
|>making grant applications.  What I want to know is, should I inform them
|>that I *already* hold the patent on the process, or do I just wait untill
|>they have some important rtesearch then sue for infringment?  What do you
|>net folk think.  BTW I also scooped some of their grants because I submitted
|>them 10 months ago to some of the same agencies they are now applying to.  
|>	I think large institutions are in the habit of taking what they want
|>and then being thanked for it.  I know that 99% of the students would never
|>have taken the precautions I did or even known how.  

If you were doing the research in pursuit of a degree, you may find that to
receive the degree, you must assign rights to your invention (when thepatent
is granted) to the University.  It is fairly standard operating procedure that
the University owns all rights to the results of research, especially
dissertation research, undergone in pursuit of a degree.  If they haven't
given
you your PhD yet, don't push them too hard.  If it ends up in court,
you'll find that students have very few rights in these matters, and that
Universities have very few obligations.

--PSW


------ Internet Message Header Follows ------
Newsgroups: alt.grad-student.tenured,bionet.general,sci.bio,sci.research
Path:
gila.together.org!csn!decwrl!pa.dec.com!nntpd2.cxo.dec.com!adserv.enet.dec.com!winalski
From: winalski at adserv.enet.dec.com (Paul S. Winalski)
Subject: Re: Ethics in research question
Message-ID: <1993Aug19.000027.10884 at nntpd2.cxo.dec.com>
Lines: 34
Sender: usenet at nntpd2.cxo.dec.com (USENET News System)
Reply-To: winalski at adserv.enet.dec.com (Paul S. Winalski)
Organization: Digital Equipment Corporation, Nashua NH
X-Newsreader: mxrn 6.18-5
References: <1993Aug18.144401.18277 at ncsu.edu>
<1993Aug18.190242.5655 at virginia.edu> <24u47k$7nu at news.u.washington.edu> <CBz4zG.830 at world.std.com>
Date: Thu, 19 Aug 1993 00:00:27 GMT



More information about the Bioforum mailing list