How does an innocent scientist learn that bionet exists?

cherry at OPAL.MGH.HARVARD.EDU cherry at OPAL.MGH.HARVARD.EDU
Fri Feb 19 11:39:16 EST 1993


In article <Feb.18.10.33.04.1993.18263 at net.bio.net>, kristoff at net.bio.net (David Kristofferson) writes:
>dan at cubmol.bio.columbia.edu (Daniel Zabetakis) writes:
>>   For both questions, group 1 is much smaller that group 2. So those who
>>are availible to read bionet are a very small minority. Further, this
>>group contains almost no PI's.
>
>I think that you will find quite a few PI's on ARABIDOPSIS, for
>example, and I am also extremely optimistic about the proposal for the
>Drosophila newsgroup.  It may take another ten years or more, but I
>firmly believe that the young people cutting their teeth on networks
>now will change this "no PI's" situation dramatically too.

To take this discussion in a lateral direction. I think you'll find
that most of the "PIs" that read the Arabidopsis BioSci group do so
via e-mail, not news. The interest in the Arabidopsis group increased
quick quickly because most all the PIs (at least in the US) read the
list, and many post information. However I would guess that the
majority of the Arabidopsis list readers do not read any other BioSci
group.

As someone pointed out in another posting on this tread the first step
to increasing use of BioSci has to involve getting people to use the
computer as a general tool. But I think what helped the Arabidopsis
list grow so quickly and have such great coverage of the Arabidopsis
community was the demand created by a few of the leading scientist
using the network, notably Chris Somerville. The Arabidopsis community
even used the network to hold an electronic for a US national steering
committee that works with the funding agencies.

I think the promotional work that Dave is doing for BioSci is
required. But the biggest effects come from the community using this
resource. The demand has to come from the scientists themselves. So a
steady encouragement by Dave and others is doing good. The harder task
of getting individual scientists on the network still must be done one
on one. So basically the best way to increase the use of the network
is for each of us to talk it up and be willing to take time and show
others how it works.

Mike



More information about the Bioforum mailing list