INFO. ON IMAGE ANALYSIS

Centre For Waste Technology wastec at unpsun1.cc.unp.ac.za
Thu Jan 7 08:31:02 EST 1993


Hello image analysis users,
 
RE: INFORMATION ON IMAGE ANALYSIS 

Image analysis (IA) is an analytical technique which is becoming
more frequently used in scientific and industrial fields, and
this is reflected by our experiences in the Electron Microscope
Unit of the University of Natal, SA.  This facility is being
established to offer teaching, research and service to the whole
scientific community.

     The wide range of different applications for our image
analysis system (A Kontron Vidas 2.1 full colour system) is
summarised below.  An example of semi-automatic IA in our
laboratory is a study to determine the ratio of lipid to
cytoplasm volume in plant cells as revealed in a series of TEM
micrographs.  Fully automatic IA, comprising the writing of
macros, is often use.  Projects include the determination of mean
size and viability of yeast cells viewed under a microscope and a
project in which the different bacterial species in an anaerobic
digester granule were identified and their average and total
length calculated from a sequential series of TEM micrographs
recorded by a video camera mounted on a copy stand.  Interactive
IA was used in the study of phenocryst orientation in magma flow
where very thin sections of rock were cut, polished, and an image
captured with a video camera mounted on a light microscope. 
Other examples include the quantification of fluorescent bacteria
on surfaces (light micrographs of surfaces using an
epifluorescent microscope), the quantification of lumen area in
wood samples (live image of stained wood sections from a light
microscope) and the accurate determination of the growth rate of
morphologically distinguished microorganisms involved in the
bioremediation of an oil-contaminated site (intermittent live
image capture from a phase contrast microscope).


     Image analysis cuts across all previous existing boundaries
in science and has such broad application that it is pointless to
remain isolated in one field.  I have the desire to shorten the
very long learning curve that exists when one is relatively new
to the image analysis field and anything that could be helpful
would be appreciated (and acknowledged).

     When developing new software (macros) for a new user it is
often of tremendous benefit to have at hand macro's written for a
similar function.  These can then be adapted to the particular
function at hand, and in a very short while the user can use the
image analyzer to perform the desired task.  I would like to
obtain more information on macros and what new uses there are for
image analysis.  The over 120 macros I have at my disposal are
all described according to their function and are freely
available from me (Email to my address).
  
     Any suggestions on sample preparation, microscopy, formation
of macro's, and general topics, etc. would be of immense value
and tremendously appreciated.  This information will be of
immense benefit to us, allowing the initial developmental stage
of any project involving image analysis to proceed rapidly.
 
If you have any questions please contact me.
 
Yours sincerely
Barry Dudley
 
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BARRY DUDLEY
International Centre for Waste Technology
Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology
University of Natal
PO Box 375
Pietermaritzburg
3200
South Africa
Email wastec at unpsun1.cc.unp.ac.za

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