Looking for address of laboratories in genetic researches

Dan Jacobson danj at welchgate.welch.jhu.edu
Thu Jun 10 08:32:55 EST 1993


In article <1993Jun9.113343.2471 at clover.csata.it> martin at mvx36.csata.it writes:
>Hi,
>
>   I am looking for the address (both e-mail nad smail) of laboratories
>   in Europe and North America which performs test on human genes
>   to identify possible sources of malformation in the progeny.
>

Let's see what gopher can do:

Point your gopher client at merlot.welch.jhu.edu and select the following:

 -->  15. Searching For Biologists/

    -->  2.  Search for All Researchers funded by NIH <?>

Now search for:

genetic and disorder and mapping

And you'll get lots of entries - one of which is as follows:

-----------

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

NYGAARD, TORBJOERN G
COLUMBIA U/NY STATE PSYCH INST
710 WEST 168TH STREET
NEW YORK, NY  10032
PERFORMING ORGANIZATION: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NEW YORK
TITLE   Molecular genetics of dopa-responsive dystonia

ABSTRACT:

    This project is focused on locating the gene for "dopa-responsive dystonia"
    (DRD), an autosomal dominant disorder.  This disorder is a distinct subset
    of childhood-onset, idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD), but has several
    features that separate it from ITD.  In some cases it may have features
    suggestive of cerebral palsy, before clinical progression should allow
    separation of the disorders.  Analysis of two families suggests that adult
    onset parkinsonism may be the clinical phenotype of gene carriers who do
    not manifest dystonia in childhood.  This finding may have clinical
    relevance in some cases of hereditary parkinsonism.
    We propose to do linkage analysis on "Family S," the largest known kindred
    affected with DRD, to identify a chromosomal region linked to DRD.  We will
    then use saturation mapping with known markers in the region or develop new
    markers by selective cloning methods to further delimit an obligate genetic
    region (OGR) for the DRD gene.  We can then test for genetic heterogeneity
    with other smaller DRD families.
    A physical map of the OGR will be constructed by techniques such as pulse
    field gel electrophoresis and chromosome "walking."  Coding sequences will
    be identified by several cloning and hybridization strategies and
    "candidate regions" compared in DNA between normal and affected individuals
    in an attempt to identify the disease locus.
    Identification of the gene for DRD may allow better understanding of the
    biochemical defect in DRD.  Improved diagnostic reliability in childhood
    dystonic conditions and some forms of adult-onset parkinsonism should be
    possible.

KEYWORDS:
         polymerase chain reaction
         autosomal dominant trait
         genetic mapping
         chromosome walking
         genetic marker
         linkage mapping
         molecular genetics
         molecular cloning
         population genetics
         human subject
         dystonia musculorum deformans
         Parkinson's disease
         nucleic acid hybridization
         DNA
         nucleic acid sequence
         gel electrophoresis
         autoradiography
         human genetic material tag


------------

Ok, now you have a snail mail address and a description of what they're
doing - lets try for an e-mail address.

Select:

 -->  12. Phonebooks Around the World/

  -->  2.  Phonebooks in North America/

    -->  19. Columbia University <CSO>

and search for -

NYGAARD

And the answer is :-)

           name: Torbjoern G Nygaard
          email: nygaard at cuccfa.ccc.columbia.edu
          phone: +1 212-305-5771
     department: Neurology



You will need to adjust your searches to fit what you're looking
for - if you have specific diseases in mind use them as search words etc.

If you've never heard of gopher, don't worry it's free and on the net,
write me a note if you'd like info on how to get started.


Best of luck,

Dan Jacobson

danj at welchgate.welch.jhu.edu



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