Need Safeguards for Gene-Tinkered Foods

Jim Owens jow at helix.nih.gov
Mon Jun 28 17:01:36 EST 1993


In article <C97A7L.sA at dartvax.dartmouth.edu> Jim Wellehan,
James.F.X.Wellehan at dartmouth.edu writes:
>The animal rights groups morally oppose animal experiments.  This is
>not a refutation of scientific evidence, unlike creationism.  The
>debate is a moral one, not a factual one.  The contention was that the
>animal-rights groups were liars.  From what I've seen, they just have a
>different viewpoint.

I don't think that is completely true.  Moral arguments will not convince
those with money to support research that animals should not be used in
scientific research.  Those people need to be convinced that research on
animals provides no worthwhile information about human beings. 
Therefore, the usefulness of animal models must be brought into question.
 And there is where scientific evidence will be argued about.  A
substantial number of clinical researchers already question the value of
animal models.  If enough people of this persuasion can reach policy
setting positions in the world of biomedical research, it will not take
long to withdraw money to support this kind of research in an era when
money for science is tight, and politicians are looking for *practical
results* from the money that is spent.

Science is hard to justify in this environment.

Jim Owens
________________________________________________________________
Opinions are solely mine, of course.



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