IEEE EMBS'94 Workshop on FUZZY LOGIN in Medicine and Biology

Bill Thompson wgthom at gandalf.rutgers.edu
Mon Apr 18 23:11:11 EST 1994


Dear  Colleague:


In the upcoming International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine 
and Biology Society (EMBS) to be held in Baltimore, November 3-6, 1994,
a two-day workshop on FUZZY LOGIC in MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY" will be held to 
highlight this emerging technology. On the first day, tutorial presentations 
will be given by  Drs. Akay, Hudson, and Cohen. On the second day, a series 
of contributed talks focusing on applications in medicine and biology will be 
given by the invited speakers.


On behalf of the workshop organization committee, I am pleased to invite you 
to attend this session. If you are interested in attending in this workshop, 
please reply by e-mail (akay at gandalf.rutgers.edu) or phone me at 
(908) 932-4906 as soon as possible.  

Looking forward to hearing from you.

 Sincerely,
 Metin AKAY, Ph.D.
 Biomedical Engineering Dept.
 Rutgers University
 P.O.Box. 909
 Piscataway, NJ 08855-0909
 Phone: (908) 932 4906
 e-mail: akay at gandalf.rutgers.edu

 
                      WORKSHOP 

             Fuzzy Logic in Medicine and Biology


 Participation: Dr. Metin Akay, Rutgers University
                Dr. Donna Hudson, UCSF
                Dr. Maurice Cohen, UCSF


Imprecisely defined classes play an important role in human thinking.
Fuzzy set theory derives from the fact almost all natural classes and
concepts are Fuzzy rather than crisp in nature. According to
Lotfi Zadeh, who is the founder of fuzzy logic,  all of the
reasoning people use everyday is Approximate in nature.
In this workshop, the concepts of fuzzy logic including the fuzzy
logic controller, fuzzy pattern recognition systems, the fuzzy expert
system, and fuzzy logic  for biological signal processing,
will be discussed in details. The implementation of the Fuzzy logic, 
uncertainity of management in medical diagnosis, knowledge-based diagnosis, 
reasoning uncertain condition will discussed. Then, the advantages of 
the fuzzy logic over the classical classification techniques will be 
discussed. The relationship between Fuzzy Logic and Probability theory will be
discussed.

Several biomedical applications including the paraplegic Gait Analysis,
the analysis of eye movements classifications, classification of 
hemodyamic trends and artifacts, segmentation of MRI, identification 
of athersclerosis, EMG pattern classification using Fuzzy logic will be 
discussed. A functioning fuzzy logic in nonlinear systems will be 
illustrated for a number of medical applications including diagnosis in 
cardiology, development of prognostic models in melanoma, noninvasive 
detection of coronary artey disese, and analysis of test results in lung 
cancer.
Participants will have an opportunity to use a fuzzy expert system
system for analysis of chest pain to see how these techniques are
utilized in practice.



               Metin Akay. Ph.D.

He received the B.S. and the M.S. degrees in electrical engineering 
from the Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 1981 and 1984. 
>From 1984 to 1986 he was in the Ph.D. programme at the same University.
He received his Ph.D. degree from Rutgers University in
1990. He is currently a visiting professor at Rutgers
University. 

He is coauthor with Dr. Welkowitz and Dr. Deutch for the new
edition of the book entitled  Theory and Design of Biomedical
Instruments (Academic Press, 1991)  and is author of Biomedical
Signal Processing (Academic Press, 1993). 
He will also author the book entitled Detection and Estimation 
of Biomedical Signals, (Academic Press, 1994 (pending). 
He has been currently teaching these two graduate courses.
He was the coathor of two papers published 1992, 1993 based on 
the noninvasive detection of coronary artery diease chosen by 
the International Federation of Medical Informatic Society as an 
representative papers beacuse of the scientific content and quality.
He was also coauthor of paper based on the noninvasive detection of 
coronary artery disease chosen by the  An International
Abstracts Journal in Mathematical Biology as an best representative paper 
in heart disease area. He won the excellence in Research award in UMDNJ-RWJ 
Medical School for his research based on the control of breathing.

His research areas of interest are fuzzy neural networks, 
wavelet theory and application to biomedical signals, biomedical 
signal processing, detection and estimation theory and application 
to biomedical signals. His biomedical research areas include 
breathing control, noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease, 
and the understanding of the autonomic nervous system.

Dr. Akay is a member of Eta Kappa, Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, The
American Heart Association, senior member of IEEE, BMES, and The 
New York Academy of Science. 


                   Donna L. Hudson, Ph.D.

     Donna L.  Hudson received  the B.S. and M.S. degrees in
Mathematics from California State University, Fresno in 1968
and 1972,  and the Ph.D. in Computer Science from University
of California,  Los Angeles  in 1981.   In  1981, Dr. Hudson
joined the  faculty at  University of  California, Davis  as
Assistant Professor of Mathematics.  Dr. Hudson is currently
Professor of  Family and  Community Medicine,  University of
California, San  Francisco.   She is  also Director  of  the
Computer Center  at UCSF  Fresno-Central San  Joaquin Valley
Medical Education  Program.  Dr. Hudson's research interests
include approximate reasoning techniques in medical decision
making, expert  systems, neural  networks, image processing,
and chaotic  modeling of  medical data.   Dr.  Hudson  is  a
member of  the AMS,  IEEE, ACM,  and ISCA.  In 1985, she was
co-author on  a paper  on pattern  recognition  in  medicine
which won  the American  Association for Medical Systems and
Informatics Best  Paper Award,  and in  1987 she was awarded
the UCSF-Fresno  Faculty Research  Award  for  her  work  on
handling of uncertainty in medical expert systems.

                              

                  Maurice E. Cohen, Ph.D.

     Maurice E.  Cohen received  the  B.S.  Honors  degree  in
Mathematics from University of London in 1963, and the Ph.D.
in Applied Mathematics from University of Wales in 1967.  He
was subsequently  a research  fellow at  the  French  Atomic
Energy Commission and was Assistant Professor of Mathematics
at Michigan  Technological  University  before  joining  the
faculty at  California State University, Fresno where he has
been Professor  of Mathematics  since  1974.    He  is  also
Adjunct Professor  of Radiology at University of California,
San Francisco.    Dr.  Cohen's  research  interests  include
medical decision  making, expert  systems, neural  networks,
mathematical  modeling   and  chaos   theory,  as   well  as
development of  new techniques  in applied mathematics.  Dr.
Cohen is  a member of the AMS and ISCA.  In 1985, he was co-
author on  a paper  on pattern recognition in medicine which
won  the   American  Association  for  Medical  Systems  and
Informatics Best Paper Award, and in 1987 he was awarded the
UCSF-Fresno Faculty  Research Award for his work on handling
of uncertainty  in medical  expert systems.   Dr.  Cohen was
named Outstanding  Professor at California State University,
Fresno in 1991.



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