Canine Genetics

JOSE FENEQUE j_f96 at calc.vet.uga.edu
Mon Mar 14 22:09:42 EST 1994


In article <19940305031041IZZYVD5 at MVS.OAC.UCLA.EDU> IZZYVD5 at MVS.OAC.UCLA.EDU writes:
>From: IZZYVD5 at MVS.OAC.UCLA.EDU
>Subject: Re: Canine Genetics
>Date: Sat, 05 Mar 1994 03:10

>In article <01H9LBG7VHTY9LVLKL at delphi.com>,
>HPUTZ at BIOTECHNET.COM writes:

>>
>>  I currently own both a Border Collie and a Cat.  I've been thinking
>>about purchasing a hunting dog and have amazed to find out that there
>>are over 500 distinct breeds of dogs the wprld(world) ovr(over).  Why
>>such a vast genetic diversity in a species that is inherently adaptable
>>to almost any environment?  Just a curriousity question for which any
>>and all speculations are acceptable.  Pardon my poor typing abilities.
>>I'm a little under the weather at this point.
>>
>>Henry Putz
>>HPUTZ at BIOTECHNET>COM                                                   D
>Just an undergraduate, but here's my guess:
>   All those breeds of dogs are not due to natural selection but from
>domestic breeding done by man.  So, over 500 groups of people around
>the world started to breed dogs selecting for different attributs, and
>you get over 500 breeds...
>   This is right, ain't it?  Back me up, PhD. types.....


I think you are right. The human intervention is the responsible for the 
diversity in dogs and cats.
Jose Feneque
College of Veterinary Medicine
The University of Georgia


      




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